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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

ACLU Statement on President's Guantánamo Comments


NEW YORK – At a press briefing today, President Obama restated his belief that the prison at Guantánamo should be closed. Anthony D. Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, responded to the president's comments by detailing immediate actions the president could take.
"We welcome the president's continuing commitment to closing Guantánamo and putting an end to the indefinite detention regime there," Romero said. "There are two things the president should do. One is to appoint a senior point person so that the administration's Guantánamo closure policy is directed by the White House and not by Pentagon bureaucrats. The president can also order the secretary of defense to start certifying for transfer detainees who have been cleared, which is more than half the Guantánamo population."
"There's more to be done, but these are the two essential first steps the president can take now to break the Guantánamo logjam," Romero said. "We couldn't agree more with President Obama's statement that the 'idea that we would still maintain forever a group of individuals who have not been tried – that is contrary to who we are, it is contrary to our interests, and it needs to stop.'"


ACLU Statement on President's Guantánamo Comments

Twenty Years Ago Today the World Wide Web Went Public


Twenty years ago today, something happened that changed the digital world forever: CERN published a statement that made the technology behind the World Wide Web available to use, by anybody, on a royalty free basis.
That decision, pushed forward by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, transformed the internet, making it a place where we can all freely share anything and everything—from social media updates, through streamed music, to YouTube videos of cats. It has fundamentally shaped the way we communicate.

Twenty Years Ago Today the World Wide Web Went Public

Presidential Math: Demographics and Immigration Reform

Democrats should pick up votes if immigration reform passes and more Hispanics and Asians are able to vote. But the effect pales compared to broader demographic changes. Compare the effects of immigration reform, population growth, and racial voting patterns on future elections. Related Article

Presidential Math: Demographics and Immigration Reform

What really happened to Valdosta, GA teen Kendrick Johnson? - BlackCommunityWeb -


What really happened to Valdosta, GA teen Kendrick Johnson?

The story of Kendrick Johnson is finally starting to be seen by the public eye, even if it’s three full months after the 17 year old was found dead at Lowndes High School, where he attended in Georgia. On Janurary 11th, Johnson was found dead in the high school’s gymnasium, rolled up inside wrestling mats and his face heavily swollen as if beaten. He also had lacerations on his face and on other parts of his body. The local Sheriff’s investigators have said that they believe Johnson fell into the mats and wasn’t able to get out, and they ruled the death an accident. The investigators clearly wanted to close the case and move on, but the family of Kendrick Johnson has pressed on for answers. They were able to get kendrick-johnsonthe Georgia Bureau of Investigation to take on the case, but their investigation has lagged, possibly due to department funding issues. The GBI has not released any information on their findings, now ten weeks after they’ve taken on the case.

The family of Kendrick Johnson has tried to use political pressure in order to get answers. Kendrick’s father Kenneth Johnson was quoted as saying: “We haven’t gotten any information. So if they’re still investigating why haven’t they brought fourth the evidence? We don’t think, we know that he was murdered.” This past week, Johnson’s family took action, and blocked the entrance of the Lowndes County Judaical Complex in a non-violent protest. They were arrested and booked, but their protest worked–it garnered national attention to a case that has lagged and that sheriff’s investigators in Lowndes hoped would quietly fade away.

What really happened to Valdosta, GA teen Kendrick Johnson? - BlackCommunityWeb -

How Mayor Harold Washington Shaped the City of Chicago


PHOTO: CHICAGO TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
Harold Washington taking the Oath of Office 30 years ago today, on April 29, 1983.
Harold Washington was sworn in as Chicago's first black mayor 30 years ago today. His impact was outsized for his relatively short tenure. To commemorate the anniversary, I thought I'd pull together some articles that help shed light on his politics, personality, and how his time in office shaped Chicago today.



How Mayor Harold Washington Shaped the City of Chicago

IT SPREADS: 5 MORE SENATORS DOWN AFTER GUN VOTE

Senators in several states who voted earlier this month against increasing background checks for gun buyers have since seen their approval ratings noticeably drop, according to new polls released Monday by the Democratic firm Public Policy Polling.

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NBCNews.com video: Congress protects air travelers alone among sequester victims

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NBCNews.com video: Congress protects air travelers alone among sequester victims: ""

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Rachel Maddow: Only most powerful spared pain of GOP-style austerity

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Rachel Maddow: Only most powerful spared pain of GOP-style austerity: ""

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Monday, April 29, 2013

Massacre in Nigeria Spurs Outcry Over Military Tactics - NYTimes.com

MAIDUGURI, Nigeria — Days later, the survivors’ faces tensed at the memory of the grim evening: soldiers dousing thatched-roof homes with gasoline, setting them on fire and shooting residents when they tried to flee. As the village rose up in smoke, one said, a soldier threw a child back into the flames.

Even by the scorched-earth standards of the Nigerian military’s campaign against Islamist insurgents stalking the nation’s north, what happened on the muddy shores of Lake Chad this month appears exceptional.

The village, Baga, found itself in the cross hairs of Nigerian soldiers enraged by the killing of one of their own, said survivors who fled here to the state capital, 100 miles south. Their home had paid a heavy price: as many as 200 civilians, maybe more, were killed during the military’s rampage, according to refugees, senior relief workers, civilian officials and human rights organizations.

Empire State Building Feud Nears Crucial Ruling - NYTimes.com

I have been seeing this building literally all of my life but each time I see it I still feel chills down my spine.  I have loved this building as long as I can remember.

Bill on Sales Tax for Internet Purchases Divides Republicans


WASHINGTON — Legislation that would force Internet retailers to collect sales taxes from their customers has put antitax and small-government activists like Grover Norquist’s Americans for Tax Reform and the Heritage Foundation in an unusual position: they’re losing.
For years, conservative Republican lawmakers have been influenced heavily by the antitax activists in Washington, who have dictated outcomes and become the arbiters of what is and is not a tax increase. But on the question of Internet taxation, their voices have begun to be drowned out by the pleas of struggling retailers back home who complain that their online competitors enjoy an unfair price 

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Martin Luther King Peace March. Thousands Oppose Vietnam War - I remember this day well.

Martin Luther King Peace March. Thousands Oppose Vietnam War - YouTube: ""

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Martin Luther King Jr. Speech Against the Vietnam War - YouTube

Martin Luther King Jr. Speech Against the Vietnam War - YouTube: ""

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Sandra Day O'Connor expresses regret about court's role in 2000 election | McClatchy


Looking back, O'Connor said, she isn't sure the high court should have taken the case.
"It took the case and decided it at a time when it was still a big election issue," O'Connor said during a talk with the Chicago Tribune's Editorial Board on Friday. "Maybe the court should have said, 'We're not going to take it, goodbye.' "
The case, she said, "stirred up the public" and "gave the court a less than perfect reputation."
"Obviously the court did reach a decision and thought it had to reach a decision," she said. "It turned out the election authorities in Florida hadn't done a real good job there and kind of messed it up. And probably the Supreme Court added to the problem at the end of the day."

Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2013/04/26/189795/retired-justice-expresses-regret.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_term=news#storylink=cpy

Sandra Day O'Connor expresses regret about court's role in 2000 election | McClatchy

GOP moves away from entitlements and toward tax reform in budget deal - The Washington Post


With another fight over the national debt brewing this summer, congressional Republicans are de-emphasizing their demand for politically painful cuts to retirement programs and focusing on a more popular prize: a thorough rewrite of the U.S. tax code.
Reining in spending on Social Security and Medicare remains an important policy goal for the GOP. But House leaders launched a series of meetings last week aimed at convincing rank-and-file lawmakers that tax reform is both wise policy and good politics and should be their top priority heading into talks with Democrats over the need to raise the federal debt limit.
The move comes weeks after President Obama responded to Republican demands to cut expensive federal retirement benefits by offering to shrink Social Security cost-of-living adjustments and raise Medicare premiums. The proposals, included in the president’s budget request, outraged seniors, and some Republicans fear that embracing them would be political suicide.


GOP moves away from entitlements and toward tax reform in budget deal - The Washington Post

Will the Bush library whitewash Hurricane Katrina? — MSNBC

Will the Bush library whitewash Hurricane Katrina? — MSNBC: "What do former President George Bush and Taylor Swift have in common? Ok, I know this sounds like a bar joke complete with a not-suitable-for-work punchline, but I offer it as a real question. Stumped? Well, Bush and Swift share the distinction of being upstaged in front of the entire nation, by none other than Kanye West."

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Melissa Harris-Perry: One woman’s story reflects urgent need for immigration reform

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Melissa Harris-Perry: One woman’s story reflects urgent need for immigration reform: ""

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Melissa Harris-Perry: The human side of genetically modified foods

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Melissa Harris-Perry: The human side of genetically modified foods: ""

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Adopted against her will: One woman shares her story — MSNBC

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Adopted against her will: One woman shares her story — MSNBC: ""

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Racial Wealth Gap Widened During Recession - NYTimes.com

WASHINGTON — Millions of Americans suffered a loss of wealth during the recession and the sluggish recovery that followed. But the last half-decade has proved far worse for black and Hispanic families than for white families, starkly widening the already large gulf in wealth between white Americans and most minority groups, according to a new study from the Urban Institute.

“It was already dismal,” Darrick Hamilton, a professor at the New School in New York, said of the wealth gap between black and white households. “It got even worse.”

Given the dynamics of the housing recovery and the rebound in the stock market, the wealth gap might still be growing, experts said, further dimming the prospects for economic advancement for current and future generations of Americans from minority groups.

The Urban Institute study found that the racial wealth gap yawned during the recession, even as the income gap between white Americans and nonwhite Americans remained stable. As of 2010, white families, on average, earned about $2 for every $1 that black and Hispanic families earned, a ratio that has remained roughly constant for the last 30 years. But when it comes to wealth — as measured by assets, like cash savings, homes and retirement accounts, minus debts, like mortgages and credit card balances — white families have far outpaced black and Hispanic ones. Before the recession, white families, on average, were about four times as wealthy as nonwhite families, according to the Urban Institute’s analysis of Federal Reserve data. By 2010, whites were about six times as wealthy.

The dollar value of that gap has grown, as well. By the most recent data, the average white family had about $632,000 in wealth, versus $98,000 for black families and $110,000 for Hispanic families.

“The racial wealth gap is deeply rooted in our society,” said Caroline Ratcliffe, one of the authors of the Urban Institute study. “It’s here, it’s not going away, and we need to care about it.”

Many experts consider the wealth gap to be more pernicious than the income gap, as it perpetuates from generation to generation and has a powerful effect on economic security and mobility. Young black people are much less likely than young white people to receive a large sum from their parents or other relatives to pay for college, start a business or make a down payment on a home, for instance. That, in turn, makes their wealth-building prospects shakier as they move into adulthood.

Two major factors helped to widen this wealth gap in recent years. The first is that the housing downturn hit black and Hispanic households harder than it hit white households, in aggregate. Many young Hispanic families, for instance, bought homes as the housing bubble was inflating and reaching its peak, leaving them saddled with heavy debt burdens as house prices plunged in places like suburban Phoenix and inland California.

Black families also were hit disproportionately by the housing collapse, because heading into the recession housing constituted a higher proportion of their wealth than for white families, leaving them more exposed when the market crashed. Higher unemployment rates and lower incomes among blacks left them less able to keep paying their mortgages and more likely to lose their homes, experts said.

Discriminatory lending practices were also a factor. “We know that communities of color, their rate of subprime or predatory loans was twice what it is in the overall population,” said Tom Shapiro, the director of the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University.

Black families also suffered bigger hits to their retirement savings, the Urban Institute found. On aggregate, the value of black families’ retirement accounts shrank 35 percent between 2007 and 2010, while white families’ accounts actually gained 9 percent over the same period. With lower earnings and higher unemployment rates leaving them with a thinner safety net to begin with, black families were more likely to take funds out of the market when it was depressed, leaving them out in the cold as the market recovered.

“That reservoir of what you can dig into for emergencies and contingencies is a lot shallower in communities of color,” Professor Shapiro said. “That pushes black families to sling off assets, like I.R.A.’s or stocks, that you might have had another goal in mind for.”

Something similar may be happening as the housing recovery takes hold. “Some people talk about it in terms of a land grab,” said Professor Hamilton of the New School, as mainly white investors are buying foreclosed homes from disproportionately minority owners. “As the housing market starts to appreciate, some of those minority buyers might not be back.”

All in all, Hispanic families lost 44 percent of their wealth between 2007 and 2010, the Urban Institute estimates, and black families lost 31 percent. White families, by comparison, lost 11 percent of their wealth. The economic turbulence worsened a gap that has persisted for as long as social scientists have measured it, and has its roots in institutional racism, they said, which, for instance, prevented black Americans from benefiting fully from the G.I. Bill back in the 1940s and 1950s.

The Urban Institute study looked at mean wealth figures, where a small number of high-net-worth families skews the averages upward. Median wealth figures — where half of households have more wealth and half less — produces lower numbers, but the trends are the same, the Urban Institute researchers said.

Even if blacks and Hispanics make progress in the years ahead as the economy improves, the persistence of the wealth gap has pushed many public-policy scholars to recommend the adoption of more ambitious programs to help reduce worsening inequality.

The Urban Institute suggests reforming government policies that encourage savings but disproportionately benefit the already wealthy and families with high incomes, like the home mortgage interest deduction. Automatic savings vehicles also might help lower-income and lower-wealth families start saving, it said.

Professor Hamilton has proposed “baby bonds,” granting savings accounts to infants, seeded with funds that allocate greater sums to families with less wealth. (Such accounts would be race-blind, Professor Hamilton stressed.) Account-holders could tap that money as young adults, to pay for college or start a business. “That’s really going to break the link of intergenerational poverty, and the intergenerational wealth gap,” Professor Hamilton argued.

But in the absence of such far-reaching measures, scholars and advocates remain generally pessimistic that the wealth gap will narrow even as members of minority groups increase their share of the American work force.

“The growth in the wealth divide is going to be very hard to close,” said Dedrick Muhammad, the senior director of the economic department at the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the civil rights organization. “I don’t have a positive feeling about racial wealth inequality resolving itself with the recovery.

Official Blog: Transparency Report: More government removal requests than ever before

Three years ago when we launched the Transparency Report, we said we hoped it would shine some light on the scale and scope of government requests for censorship and data around the globe. Today, for the seventh time, we’re releasing new numbers showing requests from governments to remove content from our services. From July to December 2012, we received 2,285 government requests to remove 24,179 pieces of content—an increase from the 1,811 requests to remove 18,070 pieces of content that we received during the first half of 2012.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Amid a String of Rapes, Delhi Police Release Whimsical Ads

Earlier this month, on the same day as the horrifying news on the front page of a national newspaper, the Hindustan Times, about a 5-year-old who had been brutally raped, there was something puzzling on page 3. It was an advertisement from the Delhi Police (DP). It showed a graphic of a happy human talking on a mobile phone and crossing the road on a crosswalk. The caption said in bold print, "Talking while crossing is a bad idea." Then, in a smaller font it advised, "Avoid talking on the phone while crossing the road. It could lead to accidents." There were several other similar ads scattered through the paper that day from the DP, speaking of equally innocuous non-issues.

Amid a String of Rapes, Delhi Police Release Whimsical Ads

The Morose Middle Class


The Middle Class is in a funk, its view of the future growing dim as fear rolls in like a storm.
An Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor poll released Thursday found that while most Americans (56 percent) hold out hope that they‘ll be in a higher class at some point, even more Americans (59 percent) are worried about falling out of their current class over the next few years. In fact, more than eight in 10 Americans believe that more people have fallen out of the middle class than moved into it in the past few years.

The Morose Middle Class

Bush’s legacy? A ‘lot of bad decisions,’ says a former aide — MSNBC

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Bush’s legacy? A ‘lot of bad decisions,’ says a former aide — MSNBC

Melissa Harris-Perry: To the members of Congress who didn’t show up

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Melissa Harris-Perry: To the members of Congress who didn’t show up: ""

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Melissa Harris-Perry: Challenges of responding to terror in post-9/11 America

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Melissa Harris-Perry: Challenges of responding to terror in post-9/11 America

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - Australia & Gun Control's Aftermath John Oliver learns it's pointless for America to study the Australian gun control experience because the situations are just too similar

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - Political Comedy - Fake News | Comedy Central: ""

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The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - George W.Bush Library Accomplished- Comedy Central

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - Political Comedy - Fake News | Comedy Central: ""

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Weak Constitution - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - 04/24/13 - A masterpiece | Comedy Central

Weak Constitution - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - 04/24/13 - Video Clip | Comedy Central: ""

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The Last Word: Rewriting the ridiculousness of presidential libraries

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The Last Word: Rewriting the ridiculousness of presidential libraries

The Last Word: Investigating the West, Texas explosion

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The Last Word: Investigating the West, Texas explosion

The Last Word: Investigating the West, Texas explosion

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The Last Word: Investigating the West, Texas explosion

Guantanamo: Increasing pressure to transfer detainees who’ve been cleared — MSNBC

Political pressure is mounting to make institutional changes to the prison camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Thursday, California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the Democratic chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, sent a letter to the Obama administration calling for the transfer of the 86 detainees who have already been cleared for release.

Guantanamo: Increasing pressure to transfer detainees who’ve been cleared — MSNBC

NBCNews.com video: Congress protects air travelers alone among sequester victims

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NBCNews.com video: Congress protects air travelers alone among sequester victims

NBCNews.com video: Obama admin stopped at so-called ‘red line’ in Syria conflict

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NBCNews.com video: Obama admin stopped at so-called ‘red line’ in Syria conflict

NBCNews.com video: Republicans drum up war in aftermath of Boston bombings (?)

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NBCNews.com video: Republicans drum up war in aftermath of Boston bombings (?)

NBCNews.com video: Obama speech to Planned Parenthood a first in US presidency

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NBCNews.com video: Obama speech to Planned Parenthood a first in US presidency

How to debunk George W. Bush’s attempts at revisionism


Every dog goes to heaven and every former president should get a shot at repairing his legacy, especially when it’s as tattered as George W. Bush’s. With the opening of his presidential library and museum this week, observers from former Bush officials to mainstream outlets were taking a fresh, rosy look at the Bush legacy. Some offered dopey and facially ridiculous cheerleading, while others offered more compelling suggestions to return to the Bush era with an open mind. After all, other presidents left office in a cloud only to be redeemed by history years later.
So, is this week making you feel a bit nostalgic for the Bush era? Don’t. It’s been almost half a decade since the 43rd president left office, and he’s looking as bad as ever. Of course, that won’t stop a small circle of admirers (many of whom used to be on his payroll) from trying, so here’s your guide to taking on the five biggest specious pro-Bush talking points put forward this week:


How to debunk George W. Bush’s attempts at revisionism

Thursday, April 25, 2013

I Can't Stop Looking at This Photo of President Obama and Barbara Bush



I Can't Stop Looking at This Photo of President Obama and Barbara Bush

No Room for Radicals in Mosques

JUST hours after the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing were identified as Muslims, Representative Peter T. King of New York, the Republican chairman of the House Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence, called for an “increased surveillance” of Islamic communities in the United States. “I think we need more police and more surveillance in the communities where the threat is coming from,” he told National Review. “The new threat is definitely from within.”

No Room for Radicals in Mosques

Politics of Paranoia


The politics of the political right have become the politics of paranoia.
According to too many of them, the country is collapsing, and the government is not to be trusted. The circle of safety is contracting. You must arm yourselves to defend your own.


Learning From China, But What?

The announcement that Stephen A. Schwarzman, the American private equity executive, will create a $300 million scholarship program for foreign students to attend Tsinghua University (with a third of the money coming out of his own pocket) made headlines in the West this week. The program will pay for 200 students to come to China each year, the bulk of them from the United States.

Learning From China, But What?

U.S. Says It Suspects Assad Used Chemical Weapons

WASHINGTON — The White House said on Thursday that American intelligence agencies now believed, with “varying degrees of confidence,” that the Syrian government had used chemical weapons, but it said it needed conclusive proof before President Obama would take action.

U.S. Says It Suspects Assad Used Chemical Weapons

A new day for the 'war on drugs'

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Rachel Maddow: Sen. Warren on rallying support for Boston bomb victims

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Rachel Maddow: Sen. Warren on rallying support for Boston bomb victims: ""

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Rachel Maddow: Terror watch list no bar to buying guns, explosives

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Rachel Maddow: Terror watch list no bar to buying guns, explosives: ""

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Rachel Maddow: Terror watch list no bar to buying guns, explosives

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Rachel Maddow: Terror watch list no bar to buying guns, explosives: ""

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Rachel Maddow: Crackpot conspiracy theories enjoy mainstreaming by right

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Rachel Maddow: Crackpot conspiracy theories enjoy mainstreaming by right: ""

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Wednesday, April 24, 2013

NBCNews.com video: The real terror threat

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NBCNews.com video: The real terror threat: ""

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D.C.’s Race Disparity in Marijuana Charges Is Getting Worse - City Desk


This weekend, dozens of marijuana activists converged on the National Mall to celebrate 4/20 and push for the drug's legalization. If photos and videos are any indication, most of the attendees were white. As a black man, I find their efforts laudable and hearteningly altruistic. D.C.'s campaign against marijuana is racist. If it wasn't, District marijuana enforcement would look a lot less abominable.
In 2010, I wrote about how Jon Gettman, a public policy professor at Shenandoah University, pored through the city's 2007 marijuana arrest records to discover the District had arrested more pot offenders per capita than any other jurisdiction in the country. Gettman also found that the overwhelming majority of pot miscreants the city went after that year—91 percent—was black.
His analysis suggested yet another black-white divide (like the one for incomeand the one for achievement) driving through the federal city. In 2007, a black person was eight times more likely to be arrested for a District marijuana offense than a white person, even though researchers have exposed what any college pot dealer can tell you from the comfort of his Barcalounger: Members of both racial groups consume cannabis at nearly equal rates.
D.C.'s dope divide is just as striking when you zoom out. According to arrest numbers obtained from the Metropolitan Police Department and crunched by a statistician, between 2005 and 2011, D.C. cops filed 30,126 marijuana offense charges. A staggering number of those—27,560, or 91 percent—were filed against African-Americans. Only 2,097 were filed against whites.


D.C.’s Race Disparity in Marijuana Charges Is Getting Worse - City Desk

West Fertilizer Co.’s environmental compliance problems go back decades | Dallasnews.com - News for Dallas, Texas - The Dallas Morning News


West Fertilizer Co.’s problems complying with Texas environmental rules go back decades, state records show.
In 1984, the company moved two large pressurized tanks of liquid anyhydrous ammonia, a potentially lethal poison, from a site in nearby Hill County to its current location in West without notifying state authorities.
Seven years passed before Texas regulators took notice and told the company to fix its paperwork. The tanks had sat at their new location, near homes, schools and a nursing home, with little or no state oversight for all that time.



West Fertilizer Co.’s environmental compliance problems go back decades | Dallasnews.com - News for Dallas, Texas - The Dallas Morning News

Pocket : 1999 McDonald's Hamburger Ages Gracefully


When David Whipple bought a McDonald's hamburger on July 7, 1999, the burger cost 79 cents and Bill Clinton was president.
Today, 14 years later, another Clinton is eyeing the presidency, not much can be purchased for less than $1, and Whipple still has his hamburger, which looks practically the same.


Pocket : 1999 McDonald's Hamburger Ages Gracefully

Google execs' 'New Digital Age' resists cyber-siren song | Internet & Media - CNET News


book review Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen are more sober than starry-eyed in this worthwhile look at how a pervasive Internet changes censorship, privacy, identity, government, and war.


Google execs' 'New Digital Age' resists cyber-siren song | Internet & Media - CNET News

Hardball: Bush’s relationship with Cheney is ‘cordial’

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Hardball: Bush’s relationship with Cheney is ‘cordial’

Hardball: Hillary Clinton’s first day on big money lecture circuit

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Hardball: Hillary Clinton’s first day on big money lecture circuit

A Moderate Muslim Helped Stop Al-Qaeda's Canadian Plot - The Daily Beast


The Globe & Mail reports that the Canadian train plot was exposed by a tip from a Toronto imam:
A tip from a Toronto imam sparked an investigation that culminated in the arrests of two men who allegedly plotted to derail a Via passenger train.
The imam alerted authorities more than a year ago about a person he regarded as an extremist who was corrupting youth in his community.
That single tip led to what the RCMP on Monday called the first-ever Canadian bust of an alleged al-Qaeda terrorist plot.



A Moderate Muslim Helped Stop Al-Qaeda's Canadian Plot - The Daily Beast

The Last Word: GOP senator rewrites himself on crucial gun vote

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The Last Word: GOP senator rewrites himself on crucial gun vote

NBCNews.com video: What is the path to violent extremism?

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NBCNews.com video: What is the path to violent extremism?