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Friday, June 22, 2018

Young Trumpies Hit D.C. - POLITICO Magazine

A bright-colored illustration of a busy downtown street scene at nighttime, where a small group of Trump supporters in red caps are surrounded by Trump-protesting multicultural millennials. | Illustration by John Jay Cabuay



"When Matt Mowers moved to Washington in November 2016, he wasn’t expecting a hero’s welcome. The young political operative had worked for Donald Trump’s campaign in New York, where you can hardly walk down the block in many neighborhoods without spying the words “Fuck Trump” scrawled somewhere on the streetscape.



But last year, his new neighbors in Dupont Circle, the upscale area known for its stately townhouses and history as a hub of gay life in the District, pulled some moves that surprised even Mowers, by then chief of staff at the State Department’s global AIDS office. In the run-up to Mowers’ first Halloween here, one of his neighbors strung up a skeleton and a pumpkin next to each other on a tree. The pumpkin had a sign: “Now kids, just because you’re orange doesn’t mean you’re related to him!” With the dangling skeleton was a more menacing note: “Donald Trump’s EPA director.”



There’s always tension when administrations change in Washington; a new cast of characters arrives, and an influx of appointees, lobbyists and hangers-on have to stake out their own ground. But the era of Donald Trump is—as in so many respects—different.



Washington is a hipper city now than it’s ever been, a place where staffers, especially young staffers who want to drink and date and live normal millennial lives, would want to live. The problem is, if you work for Trump, it’s also more hostile territory than it’s ever been. The president campaigned against the very idea of “Washington,” slammed cities as “war zones” and ran a racially charged campaign whose coded messages weren’t lost on the diverse, Democratic-leaning residents of D.C.’s buzzing neighborhoods. The bar-filled areas that became synonymous with young Washington in the Obama era—Columbia Heights, Shaw, U Street, H Street—are full of anti-Trump T-shirts and street art. Even old Republican redoubts like Spring Valley in upper Northwest aren’t very Trump-friendly....

Young Trumpies Hit D.C. - POLITICO Magazine

'Going through hell' at the border: parents split from children tell of anguish | US news | The Guardian

toys at border fence



'Going through hell' at the border: parents split from children tell of anguish | US news | The Guardian

‘I think I was being sent a message’: U.S. warned U.N. official about report on poverty in America - The Washington Post

"Philip G. Alston arrived in Washington last fall on a mission from the U.N. Human Rights Council to document poverty in America. At his first meeting, Alston said he was told by a senior State Department official that his findings may influence the United States' membership in the human rights body.



“A senior official said to me my report could be a factor in whether the U.S. decided or not to stay in the council,” said Alston, U.N. special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, who declined to name the official. “I think I was being sent a message.”





Two other people at the meeting, speaking on the condition of anonymity, confirmed Alston's account. State Department spokesman Noel C. Clay declined to comment on the meeting, which was held Dec. 1 at State.



U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley announced this week that the United States would withdraw from the Human Rights Council, citing what she called its bias against Israel. Haley also threatened a U.S. departure in 2017, saying the council whitewashed dictators' abuses. Conservatives have for years pushed for the United States to withdraw from the body, which investigates allegations of human rights abuses in U.N. member states."



‘I think I was being sent a message’: U.S. warned U.N. official about report on poverty in America - The Washington Post

Fox News vs. North Korean State TV | The Daily Show LOL

ICE Detention is “Soul-Destroying”: Eritrean Immigrant Dies by Suicide D...

Supreme Court Rules that Warrants Generally Are Required to Collect Cellphone Data - The New York Times

Finally some good news.

"The question for the justices was whether prosecutors violated the Fourth Amendment, which bars unreasonable searches, by collecting vast amounts of data from cellphone companies showing Mr. Carpenter’s movements.

In a pair of recent decisions, the Supreme Court expressed discomfort with allowing unlimited government access to digital data. It limited the ability of the police to use GPS devices to track suspects’ movements, and it required a warrant to search cellphones.

Technology companies including Apple, Facebook and Google filed a brief urging the Supreme Court to continue to bring Fourth Amendment law into the modern era. ‘No constitutional doctrine should presume,’ the brief said, ‘that consumers assume the risk of warrantless government surveillance simply by using technologies that are beneficial and increasingly integrated into modern life.’

Older Supreme Court decisions offered little protection for information about businesses’ customers. In 1979, for instance, in Smith v. Maryland, the Supreme Court ruled that a robbery suspect had no reasonable expectation that his right to privacy extended to the numbers dialed from his landline phone. The court reasoned that the suspect had voluntarily turned over that information to a third party: the phone company.

Relying on the Smith decision’s ‘third-party doctrine,’ federal appeals courts have said that government investigators seeking data from cellphone companies showing users’ movements do not require a warrant.

A federal law, the Stored Communications Act, does require prosecutors to go to court to obtain tracking data, but the showing they must make under the law is not probable cause, the standard for a warrant. Instead, they must demonstrate only that there were ‘specific and articulable facts showing that there are reasonable grounds to believe’ that the records sought ‘are relevant and material to an ongoing criminal investigation.’

The court’s decision in the case, Carpenter v. United States, No. 16-402, applied the Fourth Amendment, drafted in the 18th century, to a world in which people’s movements are continually recorded by devices in their pockets and cars, by toll plazas and by transit systems.

(Via.). Supreme Court Rules that Warrants Generally Are Required to Collect Cellphone Data - The New York Times:

Why the United States Needs More Immigrants. With the native white population aging rapidly, the U.S. economy and fiscal system are in dire need of other groups to pick up the slack. | The New Yorker

Free The Thousands of Children Racist Donald Trump Has Taken Hostage.

As HHS tent city filled with kids, Azar left for college reunion



As HHS tent city filled with kids, Azar left for college reunion