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Traumatic Slave Syndrome - The Effects of The Inter-Generational Holocaust In America

 Paul Harris Show - Post-Traumatic Slave Syndrome .mp3
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Jon Stewart Fox Has "Most Consistently Misinformed Media Viewers"

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

Obama in Flint: water crisis is a 'tragedy that never should have happened'

"The Flint water crisis was a “tragedy that never should have happened” in the US, Barack Obama said Wednesday during his first visit to the city since evidence of lead contamination emerged last fall, while residents jeered Michigan’s governor in his first public remarks before the community.

“Flint’s recovery is everybody’s responsibility,” the president told a crowd of 1,000 gathered inside a high school gymnasium. “And I will make sure that responsibility is met.”

The president focused his remarks on what he called a “corrosive” mentality in politics that “contributed to this crisis”.

“Now, I do not believe that anybody consciously wanted to hurt the people,” he said. “And this is not the place to sort out every screwup … but I do think there’s a larger issue.

“It’s a mindset that believes the less government is the highest good no matter what,” he continued. “It’s an … ideology that undervalues the common good, says we’re all on our own.”

The president’s trip included a discussion with nine residents and a local pediatrician, Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, who last fall uncovered elevated blood-lead levels in Flint children."

Obama in Flint: water crisis is a 'tragedy that never should have happened'

1973 | Meet Donald Trump - The New York Times

Donald Trump “getting into his Cadillac to begin a day of real estate deals,” was the original caption of this 1976 photograph.



1973 - Caught by Federal Government engaging in racial housing discrimination

“The government contended that Trump Management had refused to rent or negotiate rentals ‘because of race and color,’ ” The Times reported. “It also charged that the company had required different rental terms and conditions because of race and that it had misrepresented to blacks that apartments were not available.”

Donald Trump’s first quoted words in The New York Times expressed his view of the charges:

“They are absolutely ridiculous.”

“We never have discriminated,” he added, “and we never would.”

Two months later, Trump Management, represented by Roy M. Cohn, turned around and sued the United States government for $100 million (roughly $500 million in today’s terms), asserting that the charges were “irresponsible and baseless.”

“Mr. Trump accused the Justice Department of singling out his corporation because it was a large one, and because the government was trying to force it to rent to welfare recipients,” The Times reported.

Under an agreement reached in June 1975, Trump Management was required to furnish the New York Urban League with a list of all apartment vacancies, every week, for two years. It was also to allow the league to present qualified applicants for every fifth vacancy in Trump buildings where fewer than 10 percent of the tenants were black.

Trump Management noted that the agreement did not constitute an admission of guilt.1973 - Caught by Federal Government engaging in racial housing discrimination




1973 | Meet Donald Trump - The New York Times

How Donald Trump Speaks to—and About—Minorities - The Atlantic

"Trump faces significant obstacles to achieving that unity, particular with blocs that are not white men. Seven in 10 women view him unfavorably. It’s even worse with minorities. A recent Gallup poll found that 77 percent of Hispanics view Trump unfavorably. Washington Post poll pegged that number at eight in 10, seven of them “very unfavorable.” An NBC News/Survey Monkey poll found an astonishing 86 percent of African Americans had a negative view of Trump.

One reason for those atrocious ratings is the way Trump speaks to and about minorities, which was on display during his victory speech Tuesday.
“We're going to have great relationships with the Hispanics,” he said. “The Hispanics have been so incredible to me. They want jobs. Everybody wants jobs. The African Americans want jobs. If you look at what's going on, they want jobs.”
Part of Trump’s rhetorical power is his supercharged used of “we,” a method that persuades people across the country that they are part of a larger movement, and somehow share with Trump his aura of wealthy and luxury. (It’s the same technique he’s used to sell real estate for years.) In the midst of his spiel about all the ways “we” would make America great again, Trump tossed in this passage about minorities.
His phrasing is telling. First, it suggests that for Trump, blacks and Hispanics aren’t part of “we”—“they” constitute separate groups. Perhaps that’s an accidental, unthinking division, but subconscious racial division is no less dangerous. Second, it shows him assuming that minority concerns can be reduced to economics. That view is perhaps unsurprising for a man who has spent his career trying to accumulate wealth, but it is a two-dimensional view of black and Hispanic Americans."


How Donald Trump Speaks to—and About—Minorities - The Atlantic

NYTimes: Yes, It’s Early, but Donald Trump Would Have Uphill Battle Against Hillary Clinton

"Mrs. Clinton’s strength among young, nonwhite and well-educated voters would be enough to make her a favorite. The G.O.P. path to victory without adding some of these voters is narrow. The Republicans would need to do nearly as well among white voters as Ronald Reagan did in his 18-point re-election landslide in 1984 merely to fight to a draw in today’s far more diverse country. Nonwhite voters could make up nearly 30 percent of the electorate in 2016, up from 14 percent in 1984."

NYTimes: Yes, It’s Early, but Donald Trump Would Have Uphill Battle Against Hillary Clinton

Monday, May 02, 2016

NYTimes: Ted Cruz Stays Positive Despite Grim Numbers in Indiana


"An NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist poll released on Sunday showed Donald J. Trump with a lead of 15 points among likely Republican primary voters, 49 percent to 34 percent."

NYTimes: Ted Cruz Stays Positive Despite Grim Numbers in Indiana

Sunday, May 01, 2016

Daniel J. Berrigan, Defiant Priest Who Preached Pacifism, Dies at 94 - The New York Times

Daniel J. Berrigan, Defiant Priest Who Preached Pacifism, Dies at 94 - The New York Times

"The Rev. Daniel J. Berrigan, a Jesuit priest and poet whose defiant protests helped shape the tactics of opposition to the Vietnam War and landed him in prison, died on Saturday in the Bronx. He was 94.

His death, at Murray-Weigel Hall, the Jesuit infirmary at Fordham University, was confirmed by the Rev. James Martin, editor at large at America magazine, a national Catholic magazine published by the Jesuits.

The United States was tearing itself apart over civil rights and the war in Southeast Asia when Father Berrigan emerged in the 1960s as an intellectual star of the Roman Catholic “new left,” articulating a view that racism and poverty, militarism and capitalist greed were interconnected pieces of the same big problem: an unjust society.

It was an essentially religious position, based on a stringent reading of the Scriptures that some called pure and others radical. But it would have explosive political consequences as Father Berrigan; his brother Philip, a Josephite priest; and their allies took their case to the streets with rising disregard for the law or their personal fortunes.

A defining point was the burning of Selective Service draft records in Catonsville, Md., and the subsequent trial of the so-called Catonsville Nine, a sequence of events that inspired an escalation of protests across the country; there were marches, sit-ins, the public burning of draft cards and other acts of civil disobedience.


Father Berrigan, right and his brother Philip Berrigan seized hundreds of draft records and set them on fire with homemade napalm in 1968. Credit United Press International
Photo by: United Press International
The catalyzing episode occurred on May 17, 1968, six weeks after the murder of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the outbreak of new riots in dozens of cities. Nine Catholic activists, led by Daniel and Philip Berrigan, entered a Knights of Columbus building in Catonsville and went up to the second floor, where the local draft board had offices. In front of astonished clerks, they seized hundreds of draft records, carried them down to the parking lot and set them on fire with homemade napalm."

NYTimes: Obama Needles Clinton and G.O.P. Field at Correspondents’ Dinner

"But the president reserved his most biting commentary for the Republicans running for president, repeatedly turning to the party’s chaotic nominating contest for comedic fodder.

Mr. Obama mocked Senator Ted Cruz for calling a basketball hoop a “basketball ring” while campaigning in Indiana.

“What else is in his lexicon?” Mr. Obama asked, working hard to contain a broad smile. “Baseball sticks? Football hats?”

He paused, then added: “But sure, I’m the foreign one.”

The president showed a picture of Gov. John Kasich of Ohio eating pancakes as he noted that “some candidates aren’t polling high enough to qualify for their own joke tonight.” And he tweaked Republicans in the audience for their search for an alternative candidate, noting that the options for dinner were steak or fish.

“A whole bunch of you wrote in Paul Ryan,” he said. “You may not like steak or fish. But that’s your choice.”

And then there was Donald Trump. Mr. Obama riffed at length about Mr. Trump, the billionaire-turned-front-runner, who was not in attendance. The president wondered aloud why Mr. Trump had chosen not to be there.

“You’ve got a room full of reporters, celebrities, cameras, and he said no,” Mr. Obama said. “Is this dinner too tacky for the Donald?”

He joked that Mr. Trump had some foreign policy experience because “he has spent years meeting with leaders from around the world: Miss Sweden, Miss Argentina, Miss Azerbaijan.”

And he noted that Mr. Trump may be the best person to succeed in closing the prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

“Trump knows a thing or two about running waterfront properties into the ground,” Mr. Obama said."

NYTimes: Obama Needles Clinton and G.O.P. Field at Correspondents’ Dinner

Obama Roasts Trump, Drops Mic at Last White House Correspondents' Dinner - NBC News


Saturday, April 30, 2016

Prince's final days: few clues pointed to secret behind star's untimely death

Prince's final days: few clues pointed to secret behind star's untimely death

"But as soon as the sets were done, Prince was off. No after-party. No jam. He went directly to the airport to board a jet home – the same jet that would make an emergency landing two hours later with Prince apparently overdosed on an opiate painkiller and requiring a lifesaving safe shot of Narcan.

Within a week, he would be dead – from an overdose, investigators seem to believe, of the painkiller it now appears he had been taking for years to combat crippling arthritic hip pain, a condition he would not correct owing to strong religious-based resistance to medical intervention."

Recommended read from Salon.com: We must shame dumb Trump fans: The white working class are not victims

"Bill Moyers – one of those liberals who knows things and isn’t shy about showing it – remembers that when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, he was “euphoric.” Later that evening, Moyers found him in a “melancholy mood,” and asked him “what was troubling him.” The president answered, “I think we just delivered the South to the Republican Party for a long time.”

The Voting Rights Act later aggravated white voters to the point of mania, but so did Johnson’s War on Poverty, and not because of bromides about “big government.” White voters in the decades leading up to the Great Society initiative had no objection to generous social programs of assistance for the poor, disabled and illiterate. The Homestead Act, the GI Bill, Social Security, the rural electrification policies of the New Deal, and other public aid programs were uncontroversial – popular with the white working class, because they were the sole beneficiaries of government largesse. It was not until the federal government started spending white tax dollars on anti-poverty relief for spics and niggers that low-income white voters went into hysterics about the evils of dependency. Up until the Great Society, most government programs were, like Southern hotels and diners, white only.

At one point, Rensin refers to the “evangelical revival” as one possible explanation for the rise of the right-wing white voter, but demonstrates no awareness of the hideous racial politics at the center of Christian Conservatism.

Randall Balmer, in his excellent biography of President Jimmy Carter,Redeemer, documents and describes how white evangelicals were largely apathetic and apolitical prior to the 1976 presidential election. They swarmed the polls in high numbers to help usher one of their own into office. Carter’s faith and testimony seemed genuine, and white evangelicals supported him for cultural and theological reasons, rather than anything having to do with politics or public policy. By 1980, those same voters were carrying placards for the “Reagan revolution.” As Balmer explains, “Although homosexuality and, eventually, abortion, would figure into their (white evangelicals) critique, the real catalyst for their disaffection was race, especially the issue of desegregation.”

Recommended read from Salon.com: We must shame dumb Trump fans: The white working class are not victims

Friday, April 29, 2016

Paul Ryan: Let's Bring Back Pre-Existing Conditions | Crooks and Liars

"U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan called on Wednesday for an end to Obamacare’s financial protections for people with serious medical conditions, saying these consumers should be placed in state high-risk pools."

Paul Ryan: Let's Bring Back Pre-Existing Conditions | Crooks and Liars

Thursday, April 28, 2016

A Sanders Comeback Would Be Unprecedented | FiveThirtyEight



beckman-comeback-1



"Dear democratic socialists, political revolutionaries, Bern-feelers at large: We need to have a talk.



Let me begin by saying that I bear no ill will towards Mr. Sanders. Nothing that follows should be misconstrued as an attack on his policies, his track record, his electability in November or his character. I’m not a corporate media crony, or a plant from a pro-Hillary Clinton super PAC. I’m just a guy who believes in the predictive power of cold, hard data.



And the unsexy truth is that, barring some catastrophic news event, Sanders will not win the Democratic nomination for president in 2016. In fact, most past candidates in Sanders’s position dropped out long before this point in the race, and those who stayed in made little pretense of winning. (The Sanders campaign, which announced Wednesday it was laying off a ton of staff, may be recognizing this.)



Historically speaking, Democratic primary races do not have many twists and turns. Rather, the eventual winner tends to take an early lead — on or before Super Tuesday — and stay there. Runner-ups can kick for a while, but they tend to concede the race by February or early March.



As it stands, Sanders is firmly in runner-up territory. He is losing 9 million to 12 million among those who have already voted, and polls show him lagging by an average of 8.8 percentage points in the states yet to vote1. Sanders has gained substantially in national polls but is still the less popular candidate (outside of the Bernietopia that is social media2)."

A Sanders Comeback Would Be Unprecedented | FiveThirtyEight

The Retreat From Voting Rights - The New York Times





"District Court in Winston-Salem, N.C., upheld legislation passed in 2013 that imposed far-reaching restrictions on voting across this state, including strict voter-identification requirements. Judge Schroeder justified his decision by claiming that robust turnout in 2014 proved that the law did not suppress the black vote. But in reality, his ruling defended the worst attack on voting rights since the 19th century.



That attack began almost immediately after a 2013 Supreme Court decision, Shelby County v. Holder, which weakened Section 5 of the landmark Voting Rights Act. Section 5 required federal pre-approval of changes to voting laws in places with a history of discrimination, including parts of North Carolina. Within hours of that ruling, lawmakers in Raleigh filed H.B. 589, proposing some of the toughest voting rules in the country. Referring to Shelby, one sponsor expressed his relief that curtailing voting protections could move forward now that the “headache” of the Voting Rights Act had been removed. The Legislature passed the bill, and it was signed into law by Gov. Pat McCrory, a Republican.



The law eliminated voting rules that had enabled North Carolina to have the fourth best per capita voter turnout in the country. In 2012, 70 percent of black voters used early voting — and cast ballots at a slightly higher percentage than whites. Although black voters made up about 20 percent of the electorate, they made up 41 percent of voters who used same-day registration.



The North Carolina Legislature set out to change those figures and suppress minority votes. Its many impediments to voting all disproportionately affect African-American and Latino voters. None of their attacks would have survived pre-clearance under Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. A Republican official defended the law this way: “If it hurts a bunch of lazy blacks that want the government to give them everything, so be it.”



There never was evidence of voter impersonation to justify the voter ID requirements established by the law. Yet the harm of those requirements is clear: At last count, 318,000 registered North Carolina voters — disproportionately African-Americans and Latinos — do not have a driver’s license or a state ID card.



But the term “voter ID” shortchanges the law’s broad scope and intent. It reduces the early voting period and eliminates same-day registration. It expands the ability to challenge voters at the polls. It eliminates a successful preregistration program for high school students."



The Retreat From Voting Rights - The New York Times

Cruz on Fiorina being a ‘desperate’ pick | MSNBC



Cruz on Fiorina being a ‘desperate’ pick | MSNBC

Trump invokes infamous 'America First' slogan | MSNBC



Trump invokes infamous 'America First' slogan | MSNBC

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

African-American Voters Have an Understandable Reason to Support Hillary Clinton | The Nation

African-American Voters Have an Understandable Reason to Support Hillary Clinton | The Nation

"Needless to say, I cannot speak for black voters or for any individual’s choice of candidate other than my own. But I think that Sanders supporters too frequently fail to understand the conditions facing African Americans today, especially in Republican-controlled states like South Carolina. If you are a black Carolinian you know that politics is almost entirely polarized along racial lines. You have seen your governor (supposedly a forward-looking Republican) reject the expansion of Medicaid, which would enormously benefit low-income people of all races, but especially blacks. Your legislature has enacted laws designed to discourage voting by non-whites. You know that half a century after “integration” in a state where blacks make up over a quarter of the population, they represent only 10 percent of the students at the University of South Carolina and 7 percent at Clemson, the flagship public universities.

For black Carolinians, the challenge today seems to be holding on to gains that are under assault rather than seeking further progress. 

Those with an interest in history note that public representations of the state’s past almost entirely ignore the black population and that large numbers of whites are dismissive of efforts to memorialize slavery, Reconstruction, or the Jim Crow era. On the grounds of the state Capitol the Confederate flag, once prominently displayed, has been removed, but in the two dozen or so remaining monuments and markers, including the lone “African-American History Monument,” the only black person mentioned by name is Essie, the mixed-race daughter out of wedlock of Senator Strom Thurmond. When local politicians—and jurists all the way up to the Supreme—invoke the idea of state sovereignty, African Americans hear the voice of John C. Calhoun, Ben Tillman, and Thurmond himself. “Why are some people urged to ‘never forget,’” asked one member of the audience, “while we are constantly being told to ‘get over it’?”