Contact Me By Email

Contact Me By Email

Atlanta, GA Weather from Weather Underground

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

iOS 11 vs Android Oreo: Which one is winning so far? - CNET



Google announced the official rollout of Android 8.0 Oreo on Monday, and Apple walked us through iOS 11 for the iPhone back in June. Combined, these software platforms will power practically every phone in the world. So which one's winning?

The short answer: Android Oreo.

Here's why. Google is killing it on AI -- that's everything from its Google Assistant to a cool-looking feature that can copy a Wi-Fi password when you point the camera at it.

Apple isn't dead in the water by any stretch. It has a chance to catch up if it's able to make AR -- which mashes up virtual items with the actual world -- seriously mainstream.



iOS 11 vs Android Oreo: Which one is winning so far? - CNET

Racism doesn’t exist all by itself, it has support. - The Washington Post

NewImage

20-17.0001.jpg&w=1484Racism doesn’t exist all by itself, it has support. - The Washington Post: " "

(Via.)

Monday, August 21, 2017

Failing All Tests of the Presidency

We are leaderless. America doesn’t have a president. America has a man in the White House holding the spot, and wreaking havoc as he waits for the day when a real president arrives to replace him.

Donald Trump is many things — most of them despicable — but the leader of a nation he is not. He is not a great man. Hell, he isn’t even a good man.

Donald Trump is a man of flawed character and a moral cavity. He cannot offer moral guidance because he has no moral compass. He is too small to see over his inflated ego.

Trump has personalized the presidency in unprecedented ways — making every battle and every war about his personal feelings. Did the person across the street or around the world say good or bad things about him? Does the media treat him fairly? Is someone in his coterie of corruption outshining him or casting negative light on him?

ADVERTISEMENT

His interests center on the self; country be damned.

What some have always known about Trump, others are slowly coming to realize, and with great shock and horror. The presidency is revealing the essence of the man and that essence is dark.

What America saw clearly in Trump’s disastrous handling of the violence in Charlottesville was a Nazi/white nationalist apologist if not sympathizer, a reactionary rage-aholic, a liar, and a person who has absolutely no sense or understanding of history.

By claiming that there were some “very fine people” among the extremists marching in Charlottesville, the president made a profound declaration: The accommodation of racists is his creed.

As Susan Bro, whose daughter, Heather Heyer, was killed in Charlottesville, said last week, “You can’t wash this one away by shaking my hand and saying, ‘I’m sorry.’ ” Heather Heyer was killed when James Alex Fields Jr. used a speeding car to mow down a crowd of protesters who had gathered to rebuke the Nazis and white nationalists.

According to The Chicago Tribune, one of Fields’s high school teachers said he once “wrote a three-page homework paper that extolled Nazi ideology and the prowess of the F├╝hrer’s armed forces,” and that even before then, the teacher said, “he had been well aware of Fields’s racist and anti-Semitic beliefs from private discussions he had with Fields during his junior year.”

Failing All Tests of the Presidency https://nyti.ms/2vgJ3Vw

How Jeff Sessions and Donald Trump have restarted the war on drugs | US news | The Guardian



"How Jeff Sessions and Donald Trump have restarted the war on drugs

Under Obama, America’s addiction to mass incarceration seemed to fade. But then came Trump and a hardline attorney general

by Lois Beckett



"Shauna Barry-Scott remembers the moment she felt the American fever for mass incarceration break. It was an August morning in 2013, and she was in a federal prison in the mountains of West Virginia. She remembers crowding into the TV room with the other women in their khaki uniforms. Everyone who could get out of their work shifts was there, waiting. Good news was on the way, advocates had told them. Watch for it.



Some of her fellow inmates were cynical: it seemed like millions of rumors of reform had swept through the federal prison system to only then dissolve. Barry-Scott did not blame them, but she was more hopeful.



At age 41, she had been sentenced to 20 years in prison for possession with the intent to distribute 4.5 ounces of crack cocaine. “Think of a 12oz can of Coke, cut that in a third,” she explains. “And that’s what I got 20 years for.” The sentence made no sense to her. Barry-Scott’s son had been murdered in 1998, and the men charged with shooting him to death had to serve less time than she did – six and seven years each, she says.



But the amount of drugs in her possession had triggered a mandatory minimum sentence, part of a now-infamous law passed in 1986 to impose punitive sentences for certain offenses amid a rising panic over drug abuse. In 1980, some 25,000 people were incarcerated in federal prisons. By 2013 after four decades of America’s war on drugs, there were 219,000. Yet this population was just a small fraction of the estimated 2.3 million Americans locked up not only in federal prisons, but also in state facilities and local jails.....





No relief
Offenders who remain subject to a mandatory minimum penalty at sentencing, by race and ethnicity
2010
2016


White
Black
Hispanic
Other
0
20
40
60


Guardian graphic | Source: US Sentencing Commission, 2017


How Jeff Sessions and Donald Trump have restarted the war on drugs | US news | The Guardian

Nuclear Waste: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)