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Sunday, August 20, 2017

Rick Santorum Gets Crushed for saying racism debate is the problem

MSNBC Live with Velshi and Ruhle Velshi destroys trump supporter on ma...

Tens of thousands march against racism in Boston Joy Reid is joined by expert guests to discuss the president appearing to disparage the Boston counter-protesters on Twitter, and the resounding message they sent to white nationalists. AM Joy on MSNBC

 

AM Joy on MSNBC: ""

Is Russia using the Alt-Right to undermine U.S. democracy? After GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher posed with an Alt-Righter when meeting with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, our guests tell Joy Reid Russia could be manipulating fringe political actors. AM Joy on MSNBC



AM Joy on MSNBC

Outcry after Trump defends Confederate monuments Our guests discuss the president’s defense of Confederate monuments, and the growing push to remove these controversial statues nationwide, including from the U.S. Capitol. AM Joy on MSNBC



AM Joy on MSNBC

Who’s the conspiracy theorist once retweeted by Trump? Jack Posobiec has a long history of being an ‘agent provocateur,’ as our guest describes him – one who has had his security clearance suspended. AM Joy on MSNBC



AM Joy on MSNBC

Colin Kaepernick support spreads to NYPD and beyond Joy Reid and her panel discuss the calls for an NFL boycott to protest Colin Kaepernick not being hired after peacefully protesting. We also commemorate Dick Gregory, who died Saturday at 84. AM Joy on MSNBC



AM Joy on MSNBC

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Donald Trump wrong that Charlottesville counter-protesters didn't have a permit


Trump's racial attitudes have been no secret CEOs and lawmakers have broken with Trump over his Charlottesville response, but this isn't the first time he's stoked racial divisions. All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC



All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC

Frederick Douglas speaking about President Andrew Jackson, a murderous perpetrator of genocide who Trump so admires he has a picture of him behind his desk. Think "Trail of Tears" folk. Frederick Douglas was speaking about him. If the shoe fits Trump...


This is what I have been saying since he first amounted he was investigating President Obama's birthplace in 2011-2012. Trump has always been a racist. I remember from my college days in 1973. Everyone who voted for him is a racist.




All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC

Franklin Graham: 'Shame on Politicians' for Blaming Trump

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"Franklin Graham, president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, sharply criticized politicians who are blaming President Donald Trump for the violence in Charlottesville, Va."

(Via.).  Franklin Graham: 'Shame on Politicians' for Blaming Trump:

Franklin Graham Encourages Evangelicals to Think of Trump as Moses or David • ChurchLeaders.com

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"On Tuesday, Donald Trump held a meeting in New York with over 900 Evangelical leaders and conservative Catholics to allay some of their concerns about him. Franklin Graham, the president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, addressed the crowd before Trump took the stage and called out some of Trump’s characteristics that he believes makes him the better choice over Hillary Clinton.

Some of the leaders present at the meeting spoke with The Christian Post and shared highlights from Graham’s speech."

(Via.).  Franklin Graham Encourages Evangelicals to Think of Trump as Moses or David • ChurchLeaders.com:

Evangelical Racism Is Not a Growth Strategy - NYTimes.com

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"A recent open letter to the Christian evangelical church, signed by a wide array of Asian-American scholars and Christian practitioners, complained of numerous racially offensive incidents in evangelical circles. In yet another sign of callousness, Asian-Americans were initially told, in effect, to ‘get over it.’ Instead, it is U.S. white Christians who must ‘get over’ their whiteness and their failure to see the already changed face of Christian faith.

By 2040 the racial demographics of this country will no longer be predominantly white. If any church group, including U.S. evangelicals, wishes to stay apace with this momentous change, and welcome nonwhite members, its leaders and members must listen to the experiences of these new groups.

White evangelicals must stop clinging to an alibi of color-blindness. Growth within 'their' churches depends on nonwhite members. Among Asian-Americans, the fastest-growing immigrant group in the U.S., 42 percent self-identify as Christian, 15 to 20 percent as ‘evangelicals’ or ‘born again.’ They attend religious services more often than white evangelical counterparts.

If U.S. evangelical Protestant churches – now 81 percent white, according to 2012 Pew research – hope to become a more diverse representation of all the people of God, they must respond more positively to constructive criticism like that in the recent open letter.

But persistent use of derogatory racial stereotypes by many white evangelical churches continues to surface in a variety of ways, among leaders, at religious events, in church practices and, painfully often, in church curricula.

It is the conceit of religious white racism to presume that one’s evangelicalism transcends racial and cultural identities, making such ‘worldly’ labels no longer important. The letter reminds church leaders that those identities still matter. White evangelical Christians must stop clinging to an alibi of color-blindness and recognize that vibrant growth within ‘their’ churches has much to do with nonwhite members’ views of them."

(Via.). Evangelical Racism Is Not a Growth Strategy - NYTimes.com:

The racist history of evangelicals proves they’re a perfect match with Trump: Why the religious right’s love for The Donald makes sense - Salon.com

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"But really, this evangelical fervor for Trump isn’t all that surprising when you consider the history of the religious right in this country, a history which suggests these voters are less motivated by faith than they are motivated by conservative ideology. ‘Jesus’ is just the word they apply to their beliefs to make otherwise repulsive reactionary politics seem moral and righteous. Evangelical voting behavior makes way more sense if you assume the politic views come first and the Bible is just the rationalization for them.

Trump’s campaign motto is ‘Make America Great Again!’, which ties into his campaign theme of a country that’s lost its way and needs to be returned to some halcyon days of yore. What that means is pleasantly vague enough for pundits to project all sorts of narratives onto it, but I would venture that the simplest interpretation is probably the one resonating with the voters: This used to be the sort of country that would never elect a black man (or a woman) to the White House, and Trump is going to get us back to those days again.

His pitch is convincing because he’s successfully painted the rest of the GOP as people are too cowed by the forces of ‘political correctness’ to say what really needs to be said, which is evident to voters in the other candidates’ relative unwillingness (with an eye towards the general election) to race-bait as blatantly as Trump does.

That this racially provocative narrative appeals to evangelicals shouldn’t be surprising, because this particular narrative has always been the motivating, indeed formative narrative of the religious right. It’s forgotten all too often, but the religious right as we know it formed in the South as a direct reaction to the civil rights movement, and its purpose was to use ‘Jesus’ as a cover story to resist desegregation.

In 2014, historian Randall Balmer published a Politico article on this quickly fading but critically important history, where he laid out how much of the infrastructure of the religious right was established by racists who were trying to preserve segregation. As Balmer explains, after Brown v Board of Education, huge swaths of the South reinstated segregation by creating an elaborate private school system, which were deemed ‘segregation academies.’ Jerry Falwell got his start as a religious right leader founding and defending such schools.

But in 1971, the federal government ruled that private non-profit schools could not maintain a tax-exempt status if they banned black students, and the organized efforts to resist this, by using religion as a justification to resist race-mixing, turned into what we now understand as the modern religious right.

To be clear, the religious right was swift in turning away from overt racism to overt sexism as its defining feature, first by fighting the Equal Rights Amendment that would ban sex discrimination and then waging the war on legal abortion, sex ed, and contraception access. But the disappearance of overt claims that Jesus disapproves of race-mixing shouldn’t be mistaken for a total abandonment of white resentment as an organizing force for the Christian right.

Ronald Reagan gets a lot of credit, for understandable reasons, for helping shape the religious right into a definable and powerful Republican voting bloc. He did this in part by feeding them the anti-feminist rhetoric they wanted to hear, but he also did it by pumping out an endless stream of race-baiting that fed directly into the political style of the religious right, which leans heavily on urban legends and rejects empirical evidence.

Reagan loved to thrill his racist audiences by telling tales of a ‘welfare queen’ who bought a Cadillac off welfare or the ‘strapping young buck’ buying T-bones with food stamps. He argued that the Voting Rights Act was ‘humiliating to the South’ and opposed the Civil Rights Act. He kicked off his 1980 campaign in a town where civil rights workers had famously been murdered, and his speech focused on his support for those resisting desegregation. And he won the religious right’s vote, despite being a former movie star and the first (and so far only) divorced President.

Sounds an awful lot like the current front-runner of the Republican race, a man who enjoys tickling his audience with racially loaded urban legends and bigoted insinuations, and whose past as a decadent tabloid fixture and TV star doesn’t seem to ruffle religious right feathers, so long as he keeps the bigoted rhetoric coming.

And yes, while Trump’s history on reproductive rights suggests he’s not as opposed to them as the other candidates, it’s also true that his misogyny is unquestionable. The sad fact of the matter is that he doesn’t have to be against reproductive rights to prove his disdain for female independence, because contempt for women drips off him.

There’s been a lot of attention paid to the fact that Trump won the Latino vote at the Nevada caucus, but don’t believe the hype. Only 8% of the voters who turned out to the Republican caucus were Hispanic, compared to 19% in the Democratic caucus. Eighty-five percent of Republican voters in Nevada were white, compared to 59% of Democratic voters. If you want to understand Republican voters and why they thrill at Trump’s wink-and-nod race-baiting over the stylings of men named Marco Rubio and Rafael ‘Ted’ Cruz, that might be the simplest answer. Yes, even for the ones who like to talk about how much they love Jesus, who they, after all, invariably portray as a white man."

(Via.). The racist history of evangelicals proves they’re a perfect match with Trump: Why the religious right’s love for The Donald makes sense - Salon.com

Trump's evangelical panel remains intact as others disband. Here are his religious cheerleaders | US news | The Guardian

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"Donald Trump was forced to disband two business advisory councils and an infrastructure panel after some of America’s most prominent business leaders fled their posts, protesting against Trump’s statements appeasing white nationalist marchers at the weekend rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

But the president’s religious evangelical advisory board, a mix of radical born-again preachers, televangelists and conservative political influencers, still stands almost intact. Not only have members avoided criticism of the president, while occasionally scolding the violence in general – some have been openly supportive of Trump’s statements assigning blame ‘on many sides’ and slamming those who turned up to oppose the militant neo-Nazis.

(Via.).  Trump's evangelical panel remains intact as others disband. Here are his religious cheerleaders | US news | The Guardian:

Why Trump’s Charlottesville response won’t hurt him with a key chunk of his base - The Washington Post - Evangelicals Christians Continue To Demonstrate That They Are Little More Than Hypocritical Pharisees

Evangelicals Christians Continue To Demonstrate That They Are Little More Than Hypocritical  Pharisees 


"As Trump’s approval ratings among other demographics continue to slide, and an array of scandals close in on him, evangelicals could very well turn out to be one of the keys to Trump’s ability to survive. Trump will continue to depend on their support, even as he faces widespread ignominy over his response to the white-supremacist mayhem in Charlottesville last weekend..."

"...During previous times of trouble, such as the news about the meeting with the Russian lawyer, evangelicals flocked to Trump’s side. In a meeting in the Oval Office, two days after that story broke, a group of evangelical leaders prayed for Trump and laid hands on him. Three days later, Trump gave an interview to the Christian Broadcasting Network’s Pat Robertson to return the favor. “I’m so proud of everything you’re doing,” Robertson said to open the interview. “The evangelicals were so great to me,” Trump told Robertson. “They came out in massive numbers.” Robertson defended Trump, dismissing the “visceral hatred” the president supposedly receives from “the Left....”

Why Trump’s Charlottesville response won’t hurt him with a key chunk of his base - The Washington Post

Romney: Trump needs to apologize and blame racists for Charlottesville violence

"Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney took to Facebook Friday morning to again criticize how President Donald Trump handled the Charlottesville, Virginia attacks this past weekend.

“Whether he intended to or not, what he communicated caused racists to rejoice, minorities to weep and the vast heart of America to mourn,” Romney wrote. “His apologists strain to explain that he didn’t mean what we heard. But what we heard is now the reality, and unless it is addressed by the president as such, with unprecedented candor and strength, there may commence an unraveling of our national fabric.”

http://news.opera-api.com/news/detail/069d511b83e1f3509211a4a63800c9e7_us

Trump’s Money Man, How Robert Mercer, a reclusive hedge-fund tycoon, exploited America’s populist insurgency


"How Robert Mercer, a reclusive hedge-fund tycoon, exploited America’s populist insurgency."

New Yorker staff writer since 1995." style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); text-decoration: inherit; -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; text-rendering: geometricPrecision;">Jane Mayer

March 17, 2017 12:00 AM

https://www.google.com/amp/www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/27/the-reclusive-hedge-fund-tycoon-behind-the-trump-presidency/amp

President Jabberwock and the Jewish Right

"In the department of small violins, consider the moral embarrassment, after Charlottesville, Va., of right-of-center Jews who voted for Donald Trump in the election and remained — at least until last week — broadly supportive of his presidency.

I don’t mean Jared Kushner, who is beyond embarrassment. I also don’t mean the economics czar Gary Cohn and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. Standing by the president’s side during Tuesday’s catastrophic news conference in Trump Tower, the pair had that look of pre-emptive mortification reminiscent of crotch-covering soccer players bracing for a penalty kick.

At least they can console themselves with the notion — it might even be true — that they’re all that’s standing between the president and another financial crisis. But then there’s the rest of the Jewish right, this columnist among them. Last year we were given a choice between moral judgment and political opportunity.

Would we vote for a man we knew to be a casual bigot because his bigotries aligned, in some sense, with our political views? Or did we know enough about bigotry to understand that, just as the hatred that starts with Jews never ends with them, the hatred that starts with others lands all too frequently on us?

President Jabberwock and the Jewish Right https://nyti.ms/2v9MUnk

Diversity us good for business; The Moral Voice of Corporate America

"And in a rebuke to the president, who suggested that both the racist groups and the counterprotesters marching in Charlottesville were to blame for the violence there, a wave of chief executives who had agreed to advise Mr. Trump quit his business advisory councils, leading to the dissolution of two groups.

The forthright engagement of these and other executives with one of the most charged political issues in years — the swelling confidence of a torch-bearing, swastika-saluting, whites-first movement — is “a seminal moment in the history of business in America,” said Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation and a board member at PepsiCo.

“In this maelstrom, the most clarifying voice has been the voice of business,” he said. “These C.E.O.s have taken the risk to speak truth to power.”


The Moral Voice of Corporate America https://nyti.ms/2vbaP60

For Murdoch Empire, Perhaps a Decisive Point in Relationship to Trump

"At 5:55 p.m. on Thursday, James Murdoch sent an email to a list of blind-copied recipients offering a striking repudiation of President Trump and a pledge to donate $1 million to the Anti-Defamation League. He addressed the note to “friends,” stating in the first line that he was writing it in a “personal capacity, as a concerned citizen and a father.”

Yet for the son of the conservative media mogul Rupert Murdoch, who speaks regularly with Mr. Trump, it’s impossible to separate the personal, the political and the corporate.

James Murdoch’s message, which he wrote himself, was sent to a number of business associates from his company email address at 21st Century Fox, the global media conglomerate where he reigns as chief executive. And within two hours, it had been leaked to the news media, offering a window into the nuanced internal and external politics of the Murdoch media empire.

The email also raises questions about whether it is a harbinger of change at the Murdoch-controlled conservative-leaning media outlets — including Fox News, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Post — and the political direction of the company under a new generation of Murdoch leaders, James and his brother, Lachlan, the company’s executive chairman."

For Murdoch Empire, Perhaps a Decisive Point in Relationship to Trump https://nyti.ms/2vM7Zrx

Civil rights panel faults Trump policies on asset seizures, voting rights, transgender military ban

"The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights launched a multipronged critique of the Trump administration Friday, disapproving of new stances on voting rights, transgender people in the military, and asset forfeiture.

The eight-person panel, which is chaired by an Obama appointee, met Friday to discuss a range of issues, resulting in a flurry of public statements on civil rights following a week in which issues of racism and civil liberties have dominated headlines.

The commission, an independent, bipartisan federal agency, also issued a statement about the violence at a gathering of white nationalists, white supremacists and neo-Nazis in Charlottesville last weekend, which resulted in one woman being killed and more than a dozen others injured.

“White supremacy and religious intolerance dishonor national commitments we have forged over time . . . and violence in the name of these ideologies must be met swiftly and forcefully with condemnation and an unwavering and unified response,’’ the commission said in a joint statement.

By unanimous vote, the commission also said it strongly disagrees with the Justice Department’s recent decision to expand federal involvement in civil asset forfeiture by state and local police authorities. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the move last month, reversing an Obama administration decision to rein in the practice.

Civil rights panel faults Trump policies on asset seizures, voting rights, transgender military ban
http://wapo.st/2fTgmMs

The Gunmen at ‘Free Speech’ Rallies

"Even before violence erupted in Charlottesville, Va., last weekend, city residents and the police anxiously watched the arrival of self-styled militias — swaggering gangs of armed civilians in combat fatigues — standing guard over the protest by white supremacists and other racist agitators against the removal of a Confederate statue.

Who were these men, counterprotesters asked as the riflemen took up watchful positions around the protest site. Police? National Guard? The Virginia National Guard had to send out an alert that its members wore a distinctive “MP” patch. This was so people could tell government-sanctioned protectors from unauthorized militias that have been posing as law-and-order squads at right-wing rallies.

In brandishing weapons in Charlottesville, the militiamen added an edge of intimidation to a protest that was ostensibly called as an exercise in free speech. By flaunting their right to bear arms, they made a stark statement in a looming public confrontation. “You would have thought they were an army,” noted Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia, one of 45 states that allow the open carrying of rifles in public to some degree, most without a permit required

The Gunmen at ‘Free Speech’ Rallies https://nyti.ms/2v9XgDX

Joint Chiefs Denounce Racism After Trump's Comments : The Two-Way : NPR





"Members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — high-ranking military officials who advise the president — appeared to distance themselves from President Trump by publicly condemning racism in the aftermath of Trump's comments about the attack in Charlottesville.



Trump has blamed "both sides" for the violence.



Five of the country's top uniformed leaders — of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and National Guard — have all sent tweets critical of "racism," "hatred" and "extremism," after a man who reportedly expressed admiration for Nazism allegedly drove a car into a crowd of people protesting against white supremacy Saturday. One woman, Heather Heyer, was killed, and 19 other people were injured.



The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joe Dunford, said on Thursday that he hadn't commented yet because he left over the weekend for a trip to South Korea, Japan, and China.



"I can absolutely and unambiguously tell you there is no place — no place — for racism and bigotry in the U.S. military or in the United States as a whole," Dunford told reporters in Beijing Thursday.



As for his colleagues who lead America's military, Dunford said, "They were speaking directly to the force and to the American people: to the force to make clear that that kind of racism and bigotry is not going to stand inside the force. And to the American people, to remind them of the values for which we stand in the U.S. military, which are reflective of the values of the United States."



Since it was officially integrated in 1948, the U.S. military has often been perceived as being more advanced than the rest of American society when it comes to racial inclusion."



Joint Chiefs Denounce Racism After Trump's Comments : The Two-Way : NPR

The Test of Nazism That Trump Failed - The New York Times





“No. 1, I am the least anti-Semitic person that you’ve ever seen in your entire life. No. 2, racism, the least racist person.” So the president said at a news conference in February. These words left me uneasy. A moment ago, as I was looking at photographs of young men in Charlottesville, Va., who were from my home state, Ohio, and thinking about the message “Heil Hitler” on the T-shirt that one wore, it dawned on me why.



I spent years studying the testimonies of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust and the recollections of their rescuers. When the rescuers were asked why they did what they did, they usually avoided the question. If they ventured a reply, it was simply to say that they did what anyone would have done. Historians who read sources develop intuitions about the material. The intuition I developed was that people who bragged about rescuing Jews had generally not done so; they were, in fact, more likely to be anti-Semites and racists. Rescuers almost never boast.



I write these lines in Poland, where the Holocaust is present in every absence, in a house where the Polish Nobel Prize-winning poet Czeslaw Milosz spent his summers when he was the same age as the young men I see in those photographs. In 1943 in Warsaw, he watched as the wind that blew the ash over the wall of the burning ghetto caught the skirts of girls riding a carousel. He noticed how people reached out to catch bits of ash floating through the air like “dark kites.”



I found myself thinking also of another Polish Nobel Prize-winning poet, Wislawa Szymborska. She memorably described a seemingly normal woman who was caught up in her daily cares but, when the moment arrived, ran headlong into a burning building to save children who were not her own.



“We know ourselves,” Ms. Szymborska wrote, “only insofar as we have been tested.”



Until we have been tested, there is no sense in boasting of our goodness; afterward, there is no need. After Charlottesville, President Trump faced an easy test, and failed. When presented with an obvious opportunity to condemn the evil that was and is Nazism, he first waited, then equivocated, then read from a teleprompter, then relativized. He spoke of “very fine people on both sides.”



The Nazi groups that marched in Charlottesville cannot be considered a “side.” When they carry torches, they imitate Nazi rituals. When they perform the call and response of “Trump! Hail” and “Victory! Hail!” they are translating Nazi performances that we know better in German: “Hitler! Heil!” and “Sieg! Heil!” In Charlottesville, American Nazis shouted “Sieg! Heil!” as they passed a synagogue.



When the supporters of the alt-right chant that “Jews will not replace us,” they recapitulate the Nazi idea of a world Jewry that stifles the master race and must therefore be removed from the planet. When they shout “Blood and soil,” they repeat a Nazi slogan signifying that races will murder races for land without mercy and forever.



These views do not define a “side,” but rather a worldview in which the United States of America, with its Constitution and laws, and with its hard-won daily understandings of rights and responsibilities, would no longer exist.



Hitler and his henchmen strategically defined themselves, from the outset, as a “side,” as the defenders of the system against the other “side,” the left. Hitler came to power denouncing Communism, which then (unlike now) was a force in the world. In power, Hitler assimilated all opponents to the other “side” and had them sent to camps or killed. When Germany’s parliament, the Reichstag, burned, Hitler had already established in his rhetoric that the other “side” was violent, and he used the (false) claim that the other “side” had committed terrorism to bring the German republic to an end.



In the Europe of the interwar years, the growing sense that politics was defined by two “sides” came to consume the broad political center, where people can think for themselves and confront the tests of politics as responsible citizens. If everyone was on a “side,” then no one bore responsibility for society as a whole, and the center could not hold.



The president has failed when no failure can be innocent. He has provided American Nazis with three services, for which they have thanked him: He has normalized their ideology; he has excused their actions; and he has given them hope that he will blame his opponents the next time America is struck by terrorism.



A writer for The Daily Stormer (a website that takes its name from the most anti-Semitic newspaper of the Nazi period) called Charlottesville a “Beer Hall Putsch,” referring to an early attempt by Hitler to seize power. The writer’s meaning was that the events in Virginia were an early failure that promises later victory. American Nazis dream of another Reichstag fire, a moment of terror in which the president will show his true colors and his opposition can be crushed.



We might choose to forget these slogans and these events from the years before World War II, but American Nazis remember the history in their own way, and so does President Trump. The Confederate statues he admires are mostly artifacts of the early years of the 20th century, when Hitler admired the United States for its Jim Crow laws, when Mr. Trump’s father was arrested at a Klan rally, before America passed its test. The presidential slogan “America First” is a summons to an alternative America, one that might have been real, one that did not fight the Nazis, one that stayed home when the world was aflame, one that failed its test.



That America might yet become our country. Whether or not it does now depends upon us. We are being tested, and so we will come to know ourselves."



The Test of Nazism That Trump Failed - The New York Times

Friday, August 18, 2017

The Daily 202: Trump acts like the president of the Red States of America - The Washington Post




"THE BIG IDEA: Donald Trump often behaves, first and foremost, as if he is the president of the states and people who voted for him.



That’s at odds with the American tradition, and it’s problematic as a governing philosophy — especially in a moment of crisis. Trump’s initially tone-deaf response to Charlottesville underscores why.



Animated by grievance and congenitally disinclined to extend olive branches, Trump lashes out at his “enemies” — his 2020 reelection campaign even used that word in a commercial released on Sunday — while remaining reticent to explicitly call out his fans — no matter how odious, extreme or violent.



Channeling his inner-Richard Nixon, who kept an enemies list of his own, candidate Trump often claimed to speak for “a silent majority.” After failing to win the popular vote, President Trump has instead governed on behalf of an increasingly vocal but diminishing minority.



The president has held campaign-style rallies in places like West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. Indeed, almost all his political travel has been to places he carried last November. He keeps stacks of 2016 electoral maps to hand out to people visiting the Oval Office so he can point out the sea of red. He speaks often about his “base,” preferring to preach to the choir rather than evangelize for his policies. “The Trump base is far bigger & stronger than ever before,” Trump wrote on Twitter last week.



-- Apparently the president sees “the Trump base” as distinct from the GOP base: “Trump's job approval rating in Gallup Daily tracking is at 34% for the three-day period from Friday through Sunday — by one point the lowest of his administration so far,” Frank Newport wrote yesterday. “Republicans' latest weekly approval rating of 79% was the lowest from his own partisans so far, dropping from the previous week's 82%. Democrats gave Trump a 7% job approval rating last week, while the reading for independents was at 29%. This is the first time independents' weekly approval rating for Trump has dropped below 30%.” In the latest Gallup polling, 46 percent of whites approve of Trump’s job performance. That’s the same share Barack Obama had at this point in 2009. But while only 15 percent of nonwhites support Trump, 73 percent backed Obama."



The Daily 202: Trump acts like the president of the Red States of America - The Washington Post

The Daily 202: Trump acts like the president of the Red States of America - The Washington Post




"THE BIG IDEA: Donald Trump often behaves, first and foremost, as if he is the president of the states and people who voted for him.



That’s at odds with the American tradition, and it’s problematic as a governing philosophy — especially in a moment of crisis. Trump’s initially tone-deaf response to Charlottesville underscores why.



Animated by grievance and congenitally disinclined to extend olive branches, Trump lashes out at his “enemies” — his 2020 reelection campaign even used that word in a commercial released on Sunday — while remaining reticent to explicitly call out his fans — no matter how odious, extreme or violent.



Channeling his inner-Richard Nixon, who kept an enemies list of his own, candidate Trump often claimed to speak for “a silent majority.” After failing to win the popular vote, President Trump has instead governed on behalf of an increasingly vocal but diminishing minority.



The president has held campaign-style rallies in places like West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. Indeed, almost all his political travel has been to places he carried last November. He keeps stacks of 2016 electoral maps to hand out to people visiting the Oval Office so he can point out the sea of red. He speaks often about his “base,” preferring to preach to the choir rather than evangelize for his policies. “The Trump base is far bigger & stronger than ever before,” Trump wrote on Twitter last week.



-- Apparently the president sees “the Trump base” as distinct from the GOP base: “Trump's job approval rating in Gallup Daily tracking is at 34% for the three-day period from Friday through Sunday — by one point the lowest of his administration so far,” Frank Newport wrote yesterday. “Republicans' latest weekly approval rating of 79% was the lowest from his own partisans so far, dropping from the previous week's 82%. Democrats gave Trump a 7% job approval rating last week, while the reading for independents was at 29%. This is the first time independents' weekly approval rating for Trump has dropped below 30%.” In the latest Gallup polling, 46 percent of whites approve of Trump’s job performance. That’s the same share Barack Obama had at this point in 2009. But while only 15 percent of nonwhites support Trump, 73 percent backed Obama."



The Daily 202: Trump acts like the president of the Red States of America - The Washington Post

Explosive Story About Trump's Racism In The Eighties

Bill Moyers: Instead Of A 'Soul,' Donald Trump Has An 'Open Sore' | The ...

The Paradox of Tolerance


Joe: The President Is Narrowcasting | Morning Joe | MSNBC

These poll numbers validate what I have been saying about the inherently racist worldview of Trump voters. #TrumpMustGo


Andrea Mitchell: I Have Never Been More Discouraged | Morning Joe | MSNBC

Trump’s embrace of Confederate statues as a wedge issue underscores Bannon’s enduring influence - The Washington Post

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"THE BIG IDEA: Reports of Stephen K. Bannon’s death might be greatly exaggerated. President Trump’s wholehearted embrace of Confederate monuments as a new wedge issue underscores how much juice the White House’s chief strategist still has. Bannon has been in the doghouse, and Trump resents how much credit he’s gotten for his victory last November. But even if he loses his government job, which is still a possibility, the former chairman of Breitbart News’s brand of populism and scorched-earth tactics will continue to heavily influence Trump’s approach to governing…"

The Daily 202: Trump’s embrace of Confederate statues as a wedge issue underscores Bannon’s enduring influence - The Washington Post: "

No Nazi Scumbags Allowed In The US Military | Rachel Maddow | MSNBC

"Art of the Deal" Writer Says Trump Will Resign Before Year’s End. Please, please be true but I doubt it. #TrumpMustGo

Trump is the most poorly educated President in my lifetime and President Truman did not have a college education. He repeats a historical myth that if true would be a war crime committed during a American war colonizing the Philippines.


Trump Botched His Well-Wishes For Spain

NYC's Racist Symbols Under Review, Kim Kardashian Sang Karaoke with Obam...

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Steve Bannon Comes to Trump's Defense on Charlottesville: A Closer Look

Trump: America's First 'Racist Grandpa' President. Trump is far from the first racist grandpa President but Colbert is incredibly funny.

Ben Carson, another truly bad man, calls criticism of Trump’s Charlottesville response ‘little squabbles’ being ‘blown out of proportion’ - The Washington Post



Ben Carson calls criticism of Trump’s Charlottesville response ‘little squabbles’ being ‘blown out of proportion’ - The Washington Post

"CNN)Sen. Bob Corker's questioning of the President's competence Thursday is the starkest signal yet that Republican senators are returning fire in the public and pointed battle Donald Trump has waged with members of his own party.

"CNN)Sen. Bob Corker's questioning of the President's competence Thursday is the starkest signal yet that Republican senators are returning fire in the public and pointed battle Donald Trump has waged with members of his own party.

Rarely, if ever, has a Republican president had such acrimonious relations at least publicly -- with GOP senators. And Trump's tweets Thursday signal that the President has no intention of changing his tact. While some in the party -- including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell  have avoided directly criticizing the President, other senators have taken this moment in the wake of violence in Charlottesville, largely based on Trump's news conference Tuesday and his tweets since then, to offer pointed feedback of their own.



Trump mourns loss of 'beautiful statues and monuments' in wake of Charlottesville rally over Robert E. Lee statue
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2017/08/17/trump-mourns-loss-of-beautiful-statues-and-monuments-in-wake-of-charlottesville-rally-over-robert-e-lee-statue/

Third White House panel scrapped amid Trump-Charlottesville controversy

Trump: Confederate statue removals 'rip apart' American history. Trump is obviously , completely ignorant of history. He is to ignorant to be confused. The Confederate traitors tore the country apart and caused the death of over 500,000 Americans. They were murderous traitors.







"Donald Trump on Thursday again lamented the removal of Confederate statues from US cities, saying these removals “ripped apart” the country’s history and culture.

He then compared statues of Confederate leaders like Stonewall Jackson to monuments of US founding fathers, including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson."




Trump: Confederate statue removals 'rip apart' American history | US news | The Guardian

Hillary Clinton was 100% right. Trump and his supporters are a basket of deplorables.


It is time we tell the truth about those who support and those who voted for Trump. These were not innocent or good people. They were all racists, bigots and misogynists. Trump's racist. sexist and Nazi connections were reported by the media during the campaign. We all knew "America First" was a slogan of a pro Nazi American organization whose most famous member was Charles Lindberg. Donald and his father had a long history of anti-Black and anti-Hispanic racism. Everyone knew that they both had been brought to Court by Nixon's justice department for specific discriminatory policies and they settled because the evidence was overwhelming. Trump's blatant, racist policies at his Atlantic city resorts were widely reported by the video and print media with witnesses interviewed during the campaign. Trump voters and supporters have no excuse. They are bigots, pure and simple. These are not good people. They are the worst among us.


Did you visit this anti-Trump site? The US government wants your IP address | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian

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"In an unprecedented and dangerous move, Donald Trump’s justice department is threatening to violate the first and fourth amendment rights of over a million people by issuing an overboard surveillance request aimed at identifying alleged anti-Trump protesters.

The justice department is demanding that web hosting provider DreamHost hand over, among many other things, 1.3m IP addresses – essentially everyone who has ever visited an anti-Trump protest site called disruptj20.org that was organizing protests surrounding Trump inauguration in January.

Dream Host revealed the surveillance demand on Monday on their blog, also saying they were going to court to challenge the order. Dream Host called it ‘a strong example of investigatory overreach and a clear abuse of government authority’ and explained that the ‘information could be used to identify any individuals who used this site to exercise and express political speech protected under the Constitution’.

As the Guardian noted on Monday, the justice department has already ‘aggressively prosecuted activists arrested during the 20 January protests in Washington DC’, at one point in April indicting ‘more than 217 people with identical crimes, including felony rioting’.

This includes many people who claim they were just in the vicinity of property damage and had nothing to do with it – and even some journalists. There is also solid public evidence that Facebook received some extraordinary legal orders related to the events as well and are fighting them in court.

Here’s how the website disruptj20.org described its mission:

We’re planning a series of massive direct actions that will shut down the Inauguration ceremonies and any related celebrations–the Inaugural parade, the Inaugural balls, you name it. We’re also planning to paralyze the city itself, using blockades and marches to stop traffic and even public transit. And hey, because we like fun, we’re even going to throw some parties."

(Via.).  Did you visit this anti-Trump site? The US government wants your IP address | Trevor Timm | Opinion | The Guardian:

'Trump's delivering exactly what they wanted: white male supremacy' | US news | The Guardian - #RacistInChief #MisogynistInChief 'Trump's delivering exactly what they wanted: white male supremacy'

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"Leaning over a table stacked with “Resist!” buttons and “Impeach Trump” stickers, Kathy Harrington pointed to the offending spot. “It’s probably still there somewhere,” she said. Harrington, 56, was inviting attendees of the annual Musikfest bash in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, to sign up to support progressive causes – and to protest against Donald Trump.

Interactions with festival-goers over two busy weekends on Main Street in Bethlehem had been “about 75% positive, about 25% negative, and of that I would say maybe 10% more in-your-face negative,” said Harrington, who was wearing a pink “I stand with Planned Parenthood” T-shirt.

And then there was one guy who “just looked at us and spit”, said Sandra Davis, 58, a colleague of Harrington, who pointed out the evidence still evaporating from the pavement.

“They feel empowered,” Davis said of Trump supporters since the election. “They’re given voice. The louder and the more vulgar, the better.”

Images from the night before of white supremacists carrying torches in Charlottesville, Virginia, were deeply disturbing but not surprising, said another activist, Ginny Atwell.

“I think his core base are the true deplorables,” Atwell, 72, said of Trump. “The white supremacists. He’s delivering exactly what they wanted. White male supremacy.”

“No women and no minorities,” said Harrington."

“And keep everybody else out,” said Atwell.

'Trump's delivering exactly what they wanted: white male supremacy' | US news | The Guardian

Trump Lawyer Forwards Email Echoing Secessionist Rhetoric - The New York Times

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"WASHINGTON — President Trump’s personal lawyer on Wednesday forwarded an email to conservative journalists, government officials and friends that echoed secessionist Civil War propaganda and declared that the group Black Lives Matter ‘has been totally infiltrated by terrorist groups.’

The email forwarded by John Dowd, who is leading the president’s legal team, painted the Confederate general Robert E. Lee in glowing terms and equated the South’s rebellion to that of the American Revolution against England. Its subject line — ‘The Information that Validates President Trump on Charlottesville’ — was a reference to comments Mr. Trump made earlier this week in the aftermath of protests in the Virginia college town.

‘You cannot be against General Lee and be for General Washington,’ the email reads, ‘there literally is no difference between the two men.’

The contents of the email are at the heart of a roiling controversy over race and history that turned deadly last weekend in Charlottesville, where white nationalist groups clashed with protesters over the planned removal of a statue of Lee. An Ohio man with ties to white nationalist groups drove his car through a crowd, killing one woman and injuring many others, authorities say.

In a fiery news conference on Tuesday, Mr. Trump blamed ‘both sides’ for that violence. He said many of those who opposed the statue’s removal were good people protesting the loss of their culture, and he questioned whether taking down statues of Lee could lead to monuments of Washington also being removed.

Continue reading the main story The Trump White House The historic moments, head-spinning developments and inside-the-White House intrigue. Bannon Mocks Colleagues and ‘Alt-Right’ in Interview AUG 17 Trump Comments on Race Open Breach With C.E.O.s, Military and G.O.P. AUG 16 Trump’s Embrace of Racially Charged Past Puts Republicans in Crisis AUG 16 American Service Member Killed and Others Wounded in Afghanistan Raid AUG 16 Benghazi Suspect’s Statements in Ship Brig Will Be Allowed in Court AUG 16 See More »

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NEWS ANALYSIS Unlike His Predecessors, Trump Steps Back From a Moral Judgment AUG. 16, 2017

Trump Defends Initial Remarks on Charlottesville; Again Blames ‘Both Sides’ AUG. 15, 2017

Jewish Trump Staff Silent on His Defense of Rally With Anti-Semitic Marchers AUG. 16, 2017

Right and Left React to Trump’s Latest Charlottesville Comments Blaming ‘Both Sides’ AUG. 16, 2017 His words were widely criticized in Washington but were praised by white supremacists, including a former Ku Klux Klan leader.

Mr. Dowd received the email on Tuesday night and forwarded it on Wednesday morning to more than two dozen recipients, including a senior official at the Department of Homeland Security, The Wall Street Journal editorial page and journalists at Fox News and The Washington Times. There is no evidence that any of the journalists used the contents of the email in their coverage. One of the recipients provided a copy to The New York Times."

(Via.).  Trump Lawyer Forwards Email Echoing Secessionist Rhetoric - The New York Times:

The Other Inconvenient Truth - The New York Times

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"Donald Trump chose Trump Tower, the place where he began his presidential campaign, as the place to plunge a dagger into his presidency.
Trump’s jaw-dropping defense of white supremacists, white nationalists and Nazis in Charlottesville, Va., exposed once more what many of us have been howling into the wind since he emerged as a viable candidate: That he is a bigot, a buffoon and a bully.


He has done nothing since his election to disabuse us of this notion and everything to confirm it. Anyone expressing surprise is luxuriating in a self-crafted shell of ignorance.


And yet, it seems too simplistic, too convenient, to castigate only Trump for elevating these vile racists. To do so would be historical fallacy. Yes, Trump’s comments give them a boost, grant them permission, provide them validation, but it is also the Republican Party through which Trump burst that has been courting, coddling and accommodating these people for decades. Trump is an articulation of the racists in Charlottesville and they are an articulation of him, and both are a logical extension of a party that has too often refused to rebuke them.


It’s not that Democrats have completely gotten this right, either. Too often, in response to the conservative impulse to punish, the liberal impulse is to pity. Pity does not alleviate oppression; it simply assuages guilt. The pity is not for the receiver but for the giver.


But in the modern age one party has operated with the ethos of racial inclusion and with an eye on celebrating varied forms of diversity, and the other has at times appealed directly to the racially intolerant by providing quiet sufferance.


It is possible to trace this devil’s dance back to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the emergence of Richard Nixon. After the passage of the act, the Republican Party, the party of Lincoln to which black people felt considerable fealty, turned on those people and stabbed them in the back.
In 1994 John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s domestic-policy adviser and a Watergate co-conspirator, confessed this to the author Dan Baum:
“The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or blacks, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”
The era Ehrlichman referred to was the beginning of the War on Drugs. Nixon started his offensive in 1971, declaring in a speech from the White House Briefing Room: “America’s public enemy No. 1 in the United States is drug abuse. In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new, all-out offensive.”


The object of disrupting communities worked all too well — more than 40 million arrests have been conducted for drug-related offenses since 1971, with African-Americans being incarcerated in state prisons for these offenses at a rate that is 10 times greater than that for whites, according to Human Rights Watch.


In 1970, Nixon’s political strategist Kevin Phillips told The New York Times, “The more Negroes who register as Democrats in the South, the sooner the Negrophobe whites will quit the Democrats and become Republicans.”
The Republican Party wanted the racists. It was strategy, the “Southern Strategy,” and it too has proved wildly successful. From there this cancer took hold.


The party itself has dispensed with public confessions of this inclination — at least until Trump — but the white supremacy still survives and even thrives in policy. The stated goals of the Republican Party are not completely dissimilar from many of the white nationalist positions.
If you advance policies like a return to more aggressive drug policies and voter suppression — things that you know without question will have a disproportionate and negative impact on people of color, what does that say about you?
It says that you want the policies without the poison, but they can’t be made separate: The policies are the poison.
And yes, this is all an outgrowth of white supremacy, a concept that many try to apply only to vocal, violent racists but that is in fact more broadly applicable and pervasive.


People think that they avoid the appellation because they do not openly hate. But hate is not a requirement of white supremacy. Just because one abhors violence and cruelty doesn’t mean that one truly believes that all people are equal — culturally, intellectually, creatively, morally. Entertaining the notion of imbalance — that white people are inherently better than others in any way — is also white supremacy.
The position of opposing racial cruelty can operate in much the same way as opposition to animal cruelty — people do it not because they deem the objects of that cruelty their equals, but rather because they cannot countenance the idea of inflicting pain and suffering on helpless and innocent creatures. But even here, the comparison cleaves, because suffering black people are judged to have courted their own suffering through a cascade of poor choices.


This is passive white supremacy, soft white supremacy, the kind divorced from hatred. It is permissible because it’s inconspicuous. But this soft white supremacy is more deadly, exponentially, than Nazis with tiki torches.


This soft white supremacy is the very thing on which the open racists build.
The white nationalists and the Nazis simply take the next step (not an altogether illogical one when wandering down the crooked path of racial hostility) and they overlay open animus.


This is apparently what draws the ire, what leaves people aghast: open articulation of racial hatred. That to me is a criminal act of denial that refuses to deal with the reality that racism is also signified far more subtly than through the wielding of slurs and sticks.
White supremacy, all across the spectrum, is what lights the way to the final step as the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. articulated in his “The Other America” speech in 1967:


“In the final analysis, racism is evil because its ultimate logic is genocide. Hitler was a sick and tragic man who carried racism to its logical conclusion. And he ended up leading a nation to the point of killing about six million Jews. This is the tragedy of racism because its ultimate logic is genocide. If one says that I am not good enough to live next door to him, if one says that I am not good enough to eat at a lunch counter, or to have a good, decent job, or to go to school with him merely because of my race, he is saying consciously or unconsciously that I do not deserve to exist.”
Republicans, these people and this “president” are your progeny. That is the other inconvenient truth.

The Other Inconvenient Truth - The New York Times: ""

(Via.)

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Trump's Charlottesville Press Conference Showed Us Who He Really Is: A C...

I was in Charlottesville. Trump was wrong about violence on the left | Jason Wilson | Opinion | The Guardian

A memorial at 4th and Water Streets, where Heather Heyer was killed when a car rammed into a group of counterprotesters last weekend.



"Let’s talk about what really happened.



On Friday night, hundreds of white supremacists and neo-fascists had a torchlight march across the University of Virginia’s campus, a place to which they had not been invited. They openly chanted fascist slogans like “blood and soil” and “Jews will not replace us”.



When they reached a much smaller group of counter-protesters gathered around a statue of Thomas Jefferson, they surrounded them, hurled verbal abuse and then commenced beating them with lit torches and fists, and using pepper spray on them. Some protesters told me they had been sprayed with lighter fluid while naked flames burned all around them.





Two Bush presidents condemn 'racial bigotry' amid Trump backlash

 Read more

Some of the people trapped around the statue responded with fists and pepper spray, but their actions, and their posture, was entirely defensive from the start.



The “alt-right”, on the other hand, came prepared for violence, and they were spoiling for it.



That night, it was not the left that “came charging, with clubs in their hands”. Quite the contrary.



On Saturday, again, the far-right protesters came primed for violence, and most counter-protesters adopted an entirely defensive posture.



Hundreds of white supremacists, mostly young men, marched to Emancipation Park through the streets of Charlottesville in military-style formations.



Again, they chanted fascist slogans. They carried the colors of openly fascist organizations, which promote white supremacy, antisemitism, misogyny and the idea of a white ethno-state.



Many wore helmets and carried shields. Many carried clubs and chemical sprays. All of these were used on counter-protesters. And initially, the counter-protesters I saw from my perch at the south-east corner of the park used entirely passive methods to try to block the passage of the far-right groups.



As one of the far right’s formations approached Emancipation Park, I witnessed one of their number spray mace into the face of a young, female counter-protester who had done no more than talk to them.



I saw a large man, around 6ft 3in, dressed in full riot gear, swinging a club at any counter-protester he could find.



I saw a group of 250 or more white-shirted young men shove aside and threaten 20 members of the clergy who had linked arms at the top of a set of stairs, and hurl racial epithets at Cornel West.



At the time they did this, they were being monitored by counter-protesters, some of whom were themselves armed. But the fact that they were watching was welcomed by West, who said: “We would have been crushed like cockroaches if it were not for the anarchists and the antifascists.”



I was near the bottom of the stairs that West was standing at the top of. I think he’s right. And bear in mind that he and everyone else in the counter-protest were promoting the values of antiracism, feminism, LGBT rights and equality.



 One dead after car rams into anti-fascist protesters in Charlottesville

There was violence from some counter-protesters. But most, like Heather Heyer, who was allegedly killed by one of the far-right marchers, were entirely peaceful.



Heyer’s killing and the injury of 20 people with a car was the culmination of a day where the right had come prepared for violence, appeared to be thirsting for it and committed far more of it than the other side. It was also a day when they gathered in the name of white supremacy."





I was in Charlottesville. Trump was wrong about violence on the left | Jason Wilson | Opinion | The Guardian

An American Hero-Mom's graceful call to action: "I'd rather have my child-but if I'm going to give her up, we're going to make it count."


Is this surprising? Netanyahu's policies share many commonalities of those who build the vast number of the monuments gto traitors between 1915 and 1925.


Finally, I have been calling for the removal of this state sponsored tribute to traitors since I moved to Georgia in 1984. My family fled Georgia to the frontier in Florida in 1866 to escape the reign of terror in the American South.


Momentum grows to remove Confederate monuments Since the violent protests in Charlottesville, lawmakers across the south are ramping up efforts to get rid of Confederate monuments in their cities. Rev. Dr. William Barber and Rep. Stacey Abrams weigh in. All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC

All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC:

Matthews: This wasn't the time to be impartial, Mr President In looking at Charlottesville, Chris Matthews says as the leader of our country, this was and is and will be forever seen as no time to be impartial for Trump. - Hardball with Chris Matthews on MSNBC

Hardball with Chris Matthews on MSNBC

Michael Steele to GOP: You will 'reap what you sow' | MSNBC

Michael Steele to GOP: You will 'reap what you sow' | MSNBC

Joe: Trump has chosen the wrong side | MSNBC #TrumpMustGo

Joe: Trump has chosen the wrong side | MSNBC

Donald Trump Just Issued This Incredibly Chilling Threat to a Rachel Maddow Producer

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"Trump’s new head lawyer, John Dowd, completely lost his temper after Maddow pointed out a mistake that he’d made in a recent statement. Dowd had been attacking special prosecutor Robert Mueller for his handling of the investigation into Trump’s connections to Russia, claiming that any investigation into Trump’s finances violated the statute of limitations in this particular case. Maddow picked up on the fact that a statute of limitations would only apply in the case of a crime, so if Dowd was talking about them, it must mean that criminal prosecution against Trump is on the table.

Maddow pressed him on this, asking ‘Who said anything about statute of limitations? Why are you bringing that up? The statute of limitations for prosecuting what crimes exactly?’ Dowd didn’t respond well to this line of questioning, simply giving the vague answer that ‘[They] have no evidence that any of these [Trump business] entities are under investigation,’ and that ‘I’m beginning to think it’s not true. I’m beginning to wonder where the hell it came from.’

After this hostile exchange, Dowd issued a disturbing threat to the producer who had called him before hanging up the phone, stating that ‘This is the last call we’ll ever have.’ It’s hard to know exactly what he meant by this, but the implication is clear, and it could certainly be interpreted as a threat against her well being. Whatever he meant, it’s a completely inappropriate thing for a lawyer to say to a member of the press.

Trump needs to understand that threatening investigators, cabinet officials, and television producers isn’t going to get him what he wants. Threatening the members of his own team has caused them to jump ship or completely embarrass his administration in the past, threatening investigators like Robert Mueller will only serve to further motivate them to find out what crimes he’s committed, and threatening members of the press is sure to backfire."

(Via.). Donald Trump Just Issued This Incredibly Chilling Threat to a Rachel Maddow Producer:

President Trump must go - The Washington Post







"Donald Trump on Tuesday afternoon gave the most disgusting public performance in the history of the American presidency. Framed by the vulgar excess of the lobby of Trump Tower, the president of the United States shook loose the constraints of his more decent-minded advisers and, speaking from his heart, defended white supremacists and by extension, their credos of hatred. He equated with those thugs the courageous Americans who had gathered to stand up to the racism, anti-Semitism and doctrine of violence that won the cheers and Nazi salutes of the alt-right hordes to whom Trump felt such loyalty.



After several days in which Trump and his advisers wrestled with what should have been a straightforward task — condemning the instigators of the unrest that rocked Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend — Trump revealed the reason that finding those words was such a struggle. He, too, is an extremist.



No one who values the best of what the United States has stood for could watch without feeling revulsion, anger or heartbreak. No one who comes from a past such as mine, which includes similar mobs rising up and ultimately collaborating in the murder of dozens of my family members in Hitler’s Europe, could view Trump’s performance without a degree of fear as well. Certainly, the same must be true for African Americans who have watched such mobs lynch their family members and seek to deny them the most basic rights."



President Trump must go - The Washington Post

‘gotta go!’: Black pastor bolts live interview as white nationalists att...

What did you expect from Trump? - The Washington Post





""...And to top it off, he equated Robert E. Lee, who waged war against the United States and fought to continue enslavement of fellow-human beings, with George Washington. Plainly, the New York education system, Fordham University and Wharton School of Business have failed Trump, promoting him without ensuring that he possessed basic reasoning skills and a grasp of American history. But in these institutions’ defense, he is unteachable, we have learned..."




What did you expect from Trump? - The Washington Post

This is what all Trump voters voted for. Media stop giving any of them conver. They knew he was a sexist bigot but they saw a selfish self interest and voted for him or they shared his views. John Wofford​ . Trump is being no different than he was during the campaign. Shame on all of them. #TrumpMustGo


''THAT WAS INSANE.''Jake Tapper amazed by Trump’s press conference in Tr...

"Yes, TRUMP is Absolutely A RACST" - Michael Moore on Don Lemon

Donald Trump Remarks On Racist Rally Force Moral Reckoning For GOP | Rac...

Donald Trump Remarks Aid White Supremacists' Political Ambitions. Rachel doing what she does best. In a time of crisis always the the Rachel Maddow show. She will put the events of the day in an historical perspective. | Rache...

Trump remarks on racist rally force moral reckoning for GOP Steve Schmidt, veteran Republican adviser and strategist, talks with Rachel Maddow about how Donald Trump's comments about the racist rally in Virginia disgrace a generation of Americans who fought Nazis and force Republicans to speak out against their own leader. - The Rachel Maddow Show

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Breaking Crazy: Donald Trump's Charlottesville Press Conference

Has Trump done permanent damage to the presidency? In the wake of Donald Trump’s comments about Charlottesville, Joy Reid asks historian Jon Meacham: has he done permanent damage to the office of the presidency? All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC




All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC

Trump advocated support for a traitor of the United States in violation of his oath of office. #ImpeachTrump #TrumpMustGo

Amnesty

The action of a government by which all persons or certain groups of persons who have committed a criminal offense—usually of a political nature that threatens the sovereignty of the government (such as Sedition or treason)—are granted Immunity from prosecution.  

On June 13, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee wrote an important letter to General Ulysses S. Grant. Six days earlier a U.S. District Judge in Virginia named John C. Underwood had handed down a treason indictment against Lee for his role as a Confederate military leader during the Civil War. President Andrew Johnson supported Underwood’s prosecution of Lee, who could have been tried for treason because he was not included in the president’s amnesty proclamation for the majority of former Confederates. “I came to Richmond to ascertain what was proper or required of me to do,” Lee wrote to Grant. “I am ready to meet any charges that may be preferred against me, & do not wish to avoid trial.”

General Grant opposed the idea of prosecuting Lee for treason. He argued that the terms agreed upon at Appomattox granted parole to the surrendering forces. They exempted Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia from further prosecution since they promised that the defeated Confederates would “not be disturbed by U.S. authority so long as they observe their parole and the laws in force where they may reside.” To turn back on these terms and indict Lee for treason would damage the reputations of both the U.S. government and General Grant personally, hindering future efforts to reunify the country. Johnson and Grant argued over the matter for four days until Grant threatened to resign his generalship. Johnson relented and on June 20 his Attorney General James Speed ordered that no paroled officers or soldiers be arrested. General Lee would be granted amnesty and not tried for treason. His citizenship, however, would not be restored until a posthumous ceremony featuring President Gerald Ford in 1975

Why is Trump so tied to White Supremacists? He learned it from his KKK affiliated father, #TrumpMustGo


Maddow: Racism Is 'A Persistent Infection' In White American Culture | R...

Trump’s rhetorical ricochet on Charlottesville highlights basic truths about the president - The Washington Post

"When President Trump’s supporters rail against efforts to rein in his unpredictable, provocative behavior, they often call on White House aides, news reporters and Republicans in Congress to ‘let Trump be Trump.’

But from Capitol Hill to the American heartland Tuesday night, the question was posed over and over again, ‘Which Trump?’

Was it the Trump who responded to calls from senators and ordinary citizens to ‘call evil by its name,’ as Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) put it? Or was it the Trump who believes that he got where he is today by sticking to his guns and saying what no one else in public life would dare say?

The president’s rhetorical ricochet — from declining on Saturday to name the bad guys in the violent confrontation in Charlottesville to his muted acknowledgment Monday that neo-Nazis and white supremacists ‘are criminals and thugs’ and then Tuesday to a classic doubling down on his original remarks — seemed almost perfectly designed to highlight some basic truths about Donald Trump: He does not like to be told what to say. He will always find a way to pull the conversation back to himself. And he is preternaturally inclined to dance with the ones who brought him.

As his top aides stood behind him in the lobby of Trump Tower Tuesday, looking like they were wondering whether it was possible to slide right into the pink marble, the president fielded questions about the aftermath of the Charlottesville confrontation between far-right marchers and those who protested against them.

Trump on Charlottesville: 'I wanted to make sure what I said was correct' President Trump spoke about his initial statement following the violence in Charlottesville, Va., at a news conference in New York on Aug. 15. (The Washington Post) Trump’s language and demeanor were about as different as possible from his formal White House statement the day before. In his remarks Monday, Trump stood stiffly and spoke in complete sentences, using measured, calm rhetoric of the sort that he’d never come up with himself: ‘Those who spread violence in the name of bigotry strike at the very core of America,’ he said. ‘In times such as these, America has always shown its true character — responding to hate with love, division with unity, and violence with an unwavering resolve for justice.’

One day later, without teleprompter or script, Trump reverted to the kind of brash refusal to say what the establishment politicians demanding of him all weekend.

‘The statement I made on Saturday, the first statement, was a fine statement,’ he said. Then, the man who takes deep pride in never backing off from anything, the man who believes that one must never show weakness by retreating from one’s words, went right back to where he’d started on Saturday.

Speaking about his Monday speech, he said that ‘second statement was made with knowledge, with great knowledge. There’s still things — excuse me,’ he admonished a reporter who was interrupting him — ‘there’s still things that people don’t know.’

Just as he had on Saturday when he condemned violence ‘on many sides,’ repeating that phrase for emphasis, Trump now used his Tuesday exchange with reporters to double down on the idea that blame should be directed at the left as well as the right.

‘Okay, what about the alt-left that came charging at — excuse me! — what about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right,’ he said ‘Do they have any semblance of guilt?’

This was Trump unleashed, the Trump of the rallies, not the Trump of those stiff, scripted, stifling appearances with foreign leaders, those sessions where the president sits hunched over, his hands between his legs, puckering his lips, looking mightily uncomfortable, stuck with the lines put together for him by diplomats and aides who worry over every word.

Play Video 2:00 Trump: 'George Washington was a slave owner' President Trump asked if statues of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson should be removed since they owned slaves while speaking in New York on Aug. 15. With reporters about violence in Charlottesville, Va. (The Washington Post) Now, he was in his element, on his own, putting it right in the face of those who pester him constantly and poke fun at him on TV. ‘I’m not finished, fake news,’ he told another interrupting reporter.

Trump has a long history of using phrases such as ‘on many sides’ to deflect blame or to splinter any notion that he faces a united opposition. He likes to position himself as one solid, clear force lined up against a noisy, messy, unfocused opposition. In this case, although he had briefly characterized the offending party in the Virginia violence as far-right groups, he was now returning to his more typical construction, in which there was no reason to bash all of the marchers as right-wing extremists because some of them had a reasonable cause.

Politics newsletter The big stories and commentary shaping the day. Sign up ‘I’ve condemned neo-Nazis,’ Trump said. ‘I’ve condemned many different groups, but not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists, by any stretch … Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue of Robert E. Lee.’

But there were no chants about Gen. Lee on Friday night, when the far-right marchers carried their torches through the University of Virginia campus. The chants were about Jews and others who the marchers blame for their diminished role in American society."

Trump’s rhetorical ricochet on Charlottesville highlights basic truths about the president - The Washington Post:

Confederate Monuments Aren't History, They're a Cheap Cultural Memory

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Confederate Monuments Aren't History, They're a Cheap Cultural Memory:

Trump is a disgusting racist. He must go. We cannot wait to the next election. #TrumpMustGo

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Trump on Charlottesville: I Think There's Blame on Both Sides - NBC News

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(Via.). Trump on Charlottesville: I Think There's Blame on Both Sides - NBC News: "

What Jewish Children Learned From Charlottesville - The New York Times

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"This dirty Jew remembers every penny thrown at him.

The ones thrown from above, as we waited to be picked up from the public pool in my hometown on Long Island, our yarmulkes pinned to wet hair. By then, I was big enough to feel shame for the younger kids, who knew no better than to scurry around, as our local anti-Semites laughed.

I remember walking home from synagogue at my father’s side, in our suits and ties, and seeing a neighbor boy crawling on his hands and knees, surrounded by bullies, this time picking up pennies by force. I remember my father rushing in and righting the boy, and sending those kids scattering.

I remember when, at that same corner, on a different day, those budding neo-Nazis surrounded my sister, and I raced home for help. I remember my parents running back, and my father and mother (all five feet of her) confronting the parents of one of the boys, who then gave him a winking, Trumpian chiding for behavior they didn’t care to condemn. Even if it’s ‘kids with horns,’ they told their son, he should leave other children alone.

I’ll never forget the shame of it. Nor any of the other affronts, from the swastika shaving-creamed on our front door on Halloween to the kid on his bike yelling, ‘Hitler should have finished you all.’ I remember every fistfight, every broken window, every catcall and curse. I remember them because each made me — a fifth-generation American — feel unsafe and unwelcome in my own home, just as was intended.

I could, likewise, catalog every tough-Jew story of victory in the face of hatred. My favorite still: that of my bull-necked great-grandfather who worked for the railroads, who in response to the guy on the next barstool saying that there were ‘too many Jews’ in the place, knocked the bum out with a single punch, without getting up from his perch.

(Via.).  What Jewish Children Learned From Charlottesville - The New York Times: