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Sunday, June 29, 2014

Film Series Looks for the Next Big Thing - Steve Dollar, WSJ

"For 42 years, the film series "New Directors/New Films" has introduced New York audiences early on to major cinematic talents such as Spike Lee, Pedro Almodóvar and Richard Linklater.
The 27 feature-length movies and two short-film programs in this year's festival, which begins Wednesday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center and the Museum of Modern Art, promise more such discoveries.
None arrives with as much advance buzz as "Dear White People," a word-of-mouth dynamo at January's Sundance Film Festival, where the director, Justin Simien, won a special jury prize for breakthrough talent. The button-pushing film about a quartet of African-American students confronting race issues on an Ivy League campus satirizes white attitudes toward black culture. But it also looks deeper than the implications of its title, the name of a popular Twitter account Mr. Simien used to test the barbed, fast-paced dialogue........"


Film Series Looks for the Next Big Thing - WSJ

‘Dear White People’ satirizes race relations | MSNBC







‘Dear White People’ satirizes race relations | MSNBC

Inequality Is Not Inevitable - NYTimes.com

"AN insidious trend has developed over this past third of a century. A country that experienced shared growth after World War II began to tear apart, so much so that when the Great Recession hit in late 2007, one could no longer ignore the fissures that had come to define the American economic landscape. How did this “shining city on a hill” become the advanced country with the greatest level of inequality?

One stream of the extraordinary discussion set in motion by Thomas Piketty’s timely, important book, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” has settled on the idea that violent extremes of wealth and income are inherent to capitalism. In this scheme, we should view the decades after World War II — a period of rapidly falling inequality — as an aberration."

Recommended read from Salon.com: The Supreme Court's baffling tech illiteracy is becoming a big problem

"But this fixation on technological analogies is more than just an idle curiosity. It has real-world implications that are not to be underestimated. Recent years have borne out that if a technology under scrutiny cannot be analogized to a historically protected invention, it may be doomed. In 2006, for example, Chief Justice Roberts doubted that eBay was an actual invention. He asked the lawyer, Seth Waxman, what the invention of eBay was, and when Waxman explained it as an electronic market, Chief Justice Roberts responded flippantly, saying, “I mean, it's not like he invented the internal combustion engine or anything. It's very vague.”

When Waxman pushed back at Roberts, pointing out that "I'm not a software developer and I have reason to believe that neither is Your Honor,” Roberts fully explicated his contempt for the technology. “I may not be a software developer, but as I read the invention [of eBay], it’s displaying pictures of your wares on a computer network and, you know, picking which ones you want and buying them.” He next said about the multibillion-dollar Internet corporation: “I might have been able to do that.”

This came from the man who four years later asked the difference between a pager and an email."

Friday, June 27, 2014

Chris McDaniel, Thad Cochran, and black Democrats: McDaniel thinks black votes in Mississippi’s GOP primary are irregular and illegitimate.

Three days after his loss in the Mississippi Republican Senate run-off, state Sen. Chris McDaniel sounds like a bitter Scooby Doo villain. “They used everything from the race card to food stamps to saying I would shut down public education,” he said in an interview with conservative TV personality Sean Hannity. “I’ve fought for this [Republican Party] all my life, but they abandoned us, made fun of us and ridiculed us and brought in 35,000 Democrats to beat us.”



Chris McDaniel, Thad Cochran, and black Democrats: McDaniel thinks black votes in Mississippi’s GOP primary are irregular and illegitimate.

Hillary Clinton And Elizabeth Warren Are Totally Crushing The Right In Book Sales


Hillary Clinton And Elizabeth Warren Are Totally Crushing The Right In Book Sales

Reps. Israel and King, Nassau County Executive Mangano Express Concern with Unaccompanied Children Being Housed in Bethpage Site | Congressman Steve Israel

"Washington, D.C.— Today, Congressmen Steve Israel (D-Huntington) and Peter King (R-Seaford) and Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano announced their opposition to the news that the Administration is considering a former Grumman site to house the influx of unaccompanied children who are entering U.S. borders illegally. The site is near a New York State Superfund site. They have been in touch with the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the General Services Administration (GSA) to express their concern and disapproval.

Rep. Israel said, “Unaccompanied children coming into our borders is a humanitarian crisis, but housing them in an industrial warehouse near a Superfund site is not a humanitarian solution. I will continue working with Rep. King and County Executive Mangano to ensure that HHS and GSA rethink their consideration of this site.”

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

NRA Fights To Keep Convicted Stalkers Armed

100 KIDS ACCIDENTALLY SHOT DEAD SINCE NEWTOWN

" WASHINGTON -- At least 100 children were unintentionally killed by gunfire in the year following the mass shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, a new study from a leading gun control group shows.

The study, released Wednesday by Everytown for Gun Safety, is the latest sobering examination of the effects -- intended or otherwise -- that guns have in communities where children reside.

"It is preventable," said John Feinblatt, the group's president. "Too often we just say it is an accident or inevitable. But what this data shows is it's preventable."

Chris Christie's new bridge problem? | MSNBC



Chris Christie's new bridge problem? | MSNBC

Chris Christie's new bridge problem? | MSNBC



Chris Christie's new bridge problem? | MSNBC

Tea Party racial voter suppression effort fails- Cochran defeats McDaniel in Miss. primary Chris Hayes and guests discuss news of incumbent Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran’s victory over his primary opponent and tea party favorite Chris McDaniel.



All In with Chris Hayes on msnbc

Supreme Court rules cell phones cannot be searched without a warrant - A victory for the 4th Amendment. | MSNBC

Police need a warrant to search the cell phone of a person who has been arrested, absent special circumstances, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.
“Modern cell phones are not just another technological convenience. With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans ‘the privacies of life,’” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote. “The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought. Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple — get a warrant.”




Supreme Court rules cell phones cannot be searched without a warrant | MSNBC

Supreme Court rules cell phones cannot be searched without a warrant | MSNBC

Police need a warrant to search the cell phone of a person who has been arrested, absent special circumstances, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

“Modern cell phones are not just another technological convenience. With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans ‘the privacies of life,’” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote. “The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought. Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple — get a warrant.”

A victory for the 4th Amendment.

Supreme Court rules cell phones cannot be searched without a warrant | MSNBC

Monday, June 23, 2014

Congress should make itself heard about U.S. troops in Iraq - The Washington Post

The week after that meeting in the Cabinet Room, Ford spoke at Tulane University: “We, of course, are saddened indeed by the events in Indochina. But these events, tragic as they are, portend neither the end of the world nor of America’s leadership in the world. . . . Some tend to feel that if we do not succeed in everything everywhere, then we have succeeded in nothing anywhere. I reject categorically such polarized thinking. We can and we should help others to help themselves. But the fate of responsible men and women everywhere, in the final decision, rests in their own hands, not in ours.”



Congress should make itself heard about U.S. troops in Iraq - The Washington Post

Saturday, June 21, 2014

"What's the Matter with White People?" with Joan Walsh

Texas county passes reparations by ‘accident’ Melissa Harris-Perry talks about the “Juneteenth Resolution” passed by the Dallas County Commissioners Court.



Melissa Harris-Perry on msnbc

Melissa Harris-Perry Is there a solution to the crisis in Iraq? NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin, Iraq War veteran Earl Catagnus Jr., and Aneesh Raman join “MHP” to discuss the latest on the unrest in Iraq and the slippery slope to further U.S. involvement.



Melissa Harris-Perry on msnbc

Recommended read from Salon.com: Dick Cheney, Iraq and the ghosts of Vietnam

"But the history that oppresses those guys, and the entire imperialist intelligentsia they represent, goes back a lot further than Saddam Hussein and 9/11. They’re still haunted by a different specter: the American empire’s Waterloo moment in Vietnam, more than 40 years ago, and the social discord it produced in places like Madison and Berkeley and Chicago and New York. For them, the entire Iraq conflict was almost a stand-in for the real thing, a delusional salve applied to an old psychic wound. Give them Marty McFly’s time-traveling DeLorean and they’d go whizzing right past Baghdad and head for Hanoi, circa 1969, with a thermonuclear device in tow."

"What's the Matter with White People?" with Joan Walsh

Friday, June 20, 2014

Recommended read from Salon.com: Reason vs. the right: Have conservatives abandoned science and rationality?

"The recent reboot of the show Cosmos on Fox further demonstrated how partisan the very idea of science and empiricism has become. The show, which features astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson taking over the host role from the original’s Carl Sagan, was aggressive in defending science, curiosity, and following the evidence from people who would rather rely on faith or authority, but it took no partisan positions. Nonetheless, it was immediately understood by Americans both left and right as a “liberal” show, merely for its strong insistence that facts should not be ignored in favor of wishful thinking.

Even though the show was hosted on the Fox network channel, Fox News, the conservative cable channel, did not hold back in the slightest from attacking Tyson for perceived liberalism. In a shockingly racist segment, host Greg Gutfeld and guest Gavin McInnes dogged relentlessly on Tyson, insinuating that he can’t really be an astrophysicist and making fun of “white liberals” for being enthusiastic about Tyson and his work. It only grew uglier with McInnes claiming that Tyson deserved to be mistreated based on his race when he was young because he “fit the profile” by having “a huge afro.”

While that was the ugliest example of race-baiting, overall conservative media had a tendency to treat Cosmos like its insistence on empiricism and rationality was inherently a culture war issue, so much so that many Christian conservative media outlets attacked every episode in the series with fervor. It wasn’t just when it came to Tyson’s acceptance of evolutionary theory, either. Christian conservatives threw a fit because the show told the story of how Giordano Bruno, a 16th century monk, was burned at the stake for free-thinking. Even though the story fit directly into the larger argument the show made about the dangers of repressing free inquiry, Jay Richards of the Discovery Institute felt that criticizing the church for torturing a man to death should be off-limits because the man in question was a monk, not a scientist.

Or, even more hilariously, when Tyson mentioned in passing on the show that Christmas was established by the church not because it’s actually Jesus’s birthday but because the church needed a holiday to compete with the popular pagan Saturnalia, Richards completely exploded in rage and denial. “We learn that the holiday celebrated by a couple billion Christians is really a camouflaged take-over of Saturnalia, the High Holy Day when ancient Romans celebrated Saturn, the god of agriculture,” he whined. The only problem is that when Christmas was established, Christianity wasn’t a religion with two billion followers. It was an upstart faith and Saturnalia was, in fact, one of the hands-down most popular days of the year for the followers of the pagan faiths that had been dominate for thousands of years. None of this requires math to understand, but now the right has gone so anti-evidence that even boring old history is considered up for debate."

NYTimes: Health Plans Bring Pressure to Bear on Drug Prices

Friday, June 13, 2014

Iraq is Getting Partitioned After All | Bill Steigerwald | The Stag Blog

"Iraq is returning to the hellhole of civilization it’s been for three thousand years.Iraq_Dec05_Elect

Anyone who says he’s shocked at what’s about to happen there is a fool or a liar.

Smart people knew this would happen, just as smart people knew that the assholes in Washington who took us to Iraq in 2003 were making a huge mistake.

It was the same mistake the Brits made in the early 1920s when for geopolitical purposes they invented Iraq by combining three provinces of the Ottoman Empire into one dumb country where each third hated the other two thirds and they all wanted to kill each other for stupid religious reasons — just like Europe’s religious nuts did in the 1500s."

Operation Deserter Storm - Home Is Where the Hate Is - The Daily Show - Video Clip | Comedy Central




Operation Deserter Storm - Home Is Where the Hate Is - The Daily Show - Video Clip | Comedy Central

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Religious Constriction - NYTimes.com

As Gallup pointed out in a report issued last Wednesday, nearly a third of Americans continue to believe that the Bible “is the actual word of God and is to be taken literally, word for word.”
Furthermore, nearly half believe that it is “the inspired word of God but not everything in it should be taken literally.”
(I am curious which parts would get a pass from most of these respondents and which wouldn’t. Would the origins of the world fall into the literal camp? What about the rules — all or some — in books like Deuteronomy?)
About a fifth of Americans said they believe the Bible is “an ancient book of fables, legends, history, and moral precepts recorded by man.”


Religious Constriction - NYTimes.com

Kansas: Frontier of the extreme right-wing Chris Hayes reports on Kansas’s journey from being the heart of the left populist movement to now being the laboratory for ultra-conservative ideas.



Kansas: Frontier of the extreme right-wing | MSNBC

Monday, June 09, 2014

Obama Has Now Fulfilled His 4 Big Promises -- NYMag

The conservative view of President Obama has straddled two difficult-to-reconcile portraits. One indicts him as a “Reagan of the left,” fundamentally (and, in their view, disastrously) altering the shape of the state. The other casts him as a hapless mediocrity, a Jimmy Carter redux. At the moment, the latter view is more in evidence — just in the last week, columns have appeared with headlines like “Is It Too Late for Obama to Rescue His Legacy?” and “The Failed Presidency of Barack Obama.”
On January 20, 2009, when Obama delivered his inaugural address as president, he outlined his coming domestic agenda in two sentences summarizing the challenges he identified: “Homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly, our schools fail too many, and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.” Those were the four major areas of domestic reform: economic recovery measures, health-care reform, a response to climate change, and education reform. (To the justifiable dismay of immigration advocates, Obama did not call for immigration reform at the time, and immigration reform is now the only possible remaining area for significant domestic reform.) With the announcement of the largest piece of his environmental program last Monday, Obama has now accomplished major policy responses on all these things. There is enormous room left to debate whether Obama’s agenda in all these areas qualifies as good or bad, but “ineffectual” seems as though it should be ruled out at this point.


Obama Has Now Fulfilled His 4 Big Promises -- NYMag

Saturday, June 07, 2014

FBI: Bergdahl's parents have received threats | News - Home

Recommended read from Salon.com: Ronald Reagan "treason" amnesia: GOP hypocrites forget their hero negotiated with terrorists. He was just really bad at it

"Not only did Reagan deal with terrorists as president, as revealed in the Iran-Contra scandal, the preponderance of evidence now supports the charge that his campaign negotiated with Iranian hostage-takers while he was running for president in 1980, to delay the release of hostages before the election, which could have helped Carter win reelection — what was known as “The October Surprise.” Given that Reagan wasn't president then, but was negotiating to thwart a president's attempt to get hostages released, this is not simply questionable behavior, it is arguably an act of treason."

Thursday, June 05, 2014

Weather Versus Climate Change

Can Bowe Bergdahl Be Tied to 6 Lost Lives? Facts Are Murky - NYTimes.com

review of casualty reports and contemporaneous military logs from the Afghanistan war shows that the facts surrounding the eight deaths are far murkier than definitive — even as critics of Sergeant Bergdahl contend that every American combat death in Paktika Province in the months after he disappeared, from July to September 2009, was his fault.


Credit U.S. Army, via Associated Press
All across Afghanistan, that period was a time of ferocious fighting. President Obama had decided to send a surge of additional troops to improve security, but they had not yet arrived. In Paktika, the eight deaths during that period were up from five in the same three months the previous year. Across Afghanistan, 122 Americans died in that period, up from 58 in 2008.

In addition, a senior insurgent commander known as Mullah Sangeen, who was part of the Taliban-linked Haqqani network, had been carrying out attacks in the area for several years. A joint military statement by American and Afghan security forces released a month before Sergeant Bergdahl vanished warned that the mullah had brought in “hundreds of foreign fighters.”

Two soldiers died during the most intense period of the search after Sergeant Bergdahl’s June 30 disappearance. Both were inside an outpost that came under attack, not out patrolling and running checkpoints looking for him. The other six soldiers died in late August and early September.

Facts are often obscured in the fog of the battlefield, witnesses have incomplete vantage points and the events are five years in the past now. But an archive of military reports logging significant activities in America’s war in Afghanistan offers a contemporaneous written record of events in Paktika that summer. The archive was made public by Chelsea Manning, formerly known as Pvt. Bradley Manning, who is serving a 35-year prison sentence for the leak.

The first two deaths the critics link to Sergeant Bergdahl involved a major assault by insurgents on a combat outpost called Zerok on July 4, 2009. Their view is that the Taliban knew the Americans were stretched thin by the search mission and took advantage of that opportunity to try to overrun it.

Mr. Bethea, the soldier who wrote the essay in The Daily Beast, said the company executive officer for the unit at Zerok believed that “the attack would not have happened had his company received its normal complement of intelligence aircraft: drones, planes, and the like. Instead, every intelligence aircraft available in theater had received new instructions: find Bergdahl. My friend blames Bergdahl for his soldiers’ deaths.”

Military officials, speaking in recent days, have countered that additional surveillance aircraft had been brought in from other areas to help in the search, so air traffic in the region was intensified, not diminished, by the search.

Separately, context supplied by the leaked logs complicates claims that insurgents attacked the outpost because of the hunt.

Insurgents had been shooting at the outpost with escalating intensity in the preceding months. A June 24 log described a mortar attack inside its perimeter and cited intelligence that insurgents were planning a “complex ambush” of the outpost.

And a log recounting the July 4 attack said it confirmed “recent reporting regarding Mullah Sangeen’s desire to conduct a spectacular attack” against the outpost. The log did not mention the hunt for Sergeant Bergdahl. Still, one soldier from Sergeant Bergdahl’s battalion said that response time after the attack had been slow, and argued the issue was not if the outpost was going to be attacked, but rather when insurgents chose to attack it.

The first and most intense phase of the search operation wound down after July 8. But former soldiers say and the logs show that the hunt continued sporadically as patrols were sent out to chase rumors that Sergeant Bergdahl had been spotted.

The other six American deaths in Paktika that summer occurred from Aug. 18 to Sept. 5, which Sergeant Bergdahl’s critics link to him as well.


Bergdahl’s Fellow Soldier Speaks Out In an interview with The Associated Press, Gerald Sutton, a former Army specialist who served with Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in Afghanistan, said Sergeant Bergdahl was a deserter. Credit By AP on Publish Date June 4, 2014 Credit
“You see a lot of anger because we lost guys not only at Zerok, but a decent amount of good guys looking” for him, said a soldier from his unit who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Where those events are identifiable in the logs, they do not mention any link to Bergdahl search operations, although the logs are terse and contain few contextual details.

Mr. Bethea wrote that of the six men killed in August and September, two died in a roadside bombing while on a reconnaissance mission, a third was shot during a search for a Taliban political leader and three others were killed while conducting patrols — two in an ambush and one who stepped on a mine.

He suggested some connection to Sergeant Bergdahl for several of the deaths, saying the Taliban leader and a village that was in the area of one of the patrols were “thought affiliated with Bergdahl’s captors.” He also said a village in the areas of the other patrol was “near the area where Bergdahl vanished.”

Still, those villages and insurgents were in the overall area of responsibility for the soldiers, and the logs make clear that the region was an insurgent hotbed. A log on May 21, 2009, for example, said it had historically been a “safe haven” for the Taliban.

A retired senior American military officer, who was briefed at the time on the search for Sergeant Bergdahl, said that even though soldiers were instructed to watch for signs of the missing American, they would have been conducting patrols and performing risky operations anyway.



 
Can Bowe Bergdahl Be Tied to 6 Lost Lives? Facts Are Murky - NYTimes.com

The prosecution of Bowe Bergdahl | MSNBC



The prosecution of Bowe Bergdahl | MSNBC

Hardball with Chris Matthews Stewart hits at Fox for Bergdahl criticism Sideshow: Jon Stewart reacts to a segment from Fox about Bowe Bergdahl’s father.






Hardball with Chris Matthews on msnbc

Hardball with Chris Matthews Politics, problems plague Bergdahl’s release The Bergdahl release was rolled out as a victory for America, but just a few days later, it’s become cause for concern as huge questions about Bergdahl’s loyalty and the five prisoners released. Chuck Todd and Clarence Page discuss.



Hardball with Chris Matthews on msnbc

Republican Leadership Conference: The GOP’s speakers lineup is a problem.

The Republican Party has a lot of problems, and if there’s one that doesn’t get enough attention, it’s the party’s broad appeal to provocateurs, faux martyrs, and grifters. Just look at the speakers list for the Republican Leadership Conference, which began on Thursday. There’s Donald Trump, the man who made “birtherism” a national cause; Herman Cain, whose presidential run was a glorified book tour; Dinesh D’Souza, who just pleaded guilty to a felony campaign finance violation, and Phil Robertson, the Duck Dynasty star who—like Cliven Bundy—believes black Americans were better off under racist oppression.


Jamelle BouieJAMELLE BOUIE
Jamelle Bouie is a Slate staff writer covering politics, policy, and race.


In fairness, I’m sure Robertson despises slavery. (Bundy, by contrast, wondered if blacks weren’t “better off as slaves, picking cotton and having a family life and doing things.”) He just thinks it wasn’t so bad under Jim Crow. “I never, with my eyes, saw the mistreatment of any black person,” said Robertson, discussing his childhood in Louisiana. “The blacks worked for the farmers. I hoed cotton with them. I’m with the blacks, because we’re white trash. We’re going across the field. … They’re singing and happy.”
But whereas Bundy was condemned by every Republican under the sun— “Bundy’s comments are completely beyond the pale,” said Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee—Robertson became a conservative hero. Of course, the main difference is that Robertson got in trouble for his views on gays. “Start with homosexual behavior and just morph out from there. Bestiality, sleeping around with this woman and that woman and that woman and those men,” he said.
On the right, this language isn’t beyond the pale. Or at least, it’s seen as a matter of religious expression, not bigotry. As such, conservatives defended Robertson as a victim of political correctness and religious intolerance. At National Review, Mark Steyn compared anti-Robertson activists to Soviet totalitarians: “Everything must be gayed. There must be Five-Year Gay Plans for American bakeries, and the Christian church, and reality TV.” Louisiana Rep. Vance McAllister brought one of Robertson’s sons to the State of the Union. At this year’s Conservative Political Action Conference, Robertson was celebrated and Sarah Palin canonized him for conservative America. “His fight was our fight and we pushed back and we won. And now everyone is happy, happy, happy,” she said.
If all of this sat in equal proportion to serious policymaking, it wouldn’t be a big deal. Annoying for liberals, but not a cause for concern. Unfortunately, in our world, the energy of the conservative movement—and thus the Republican Party—is geared toward these people. If you want money and attention, you could do worse than become a conservative provocateur. Right-wing resentment—stoked by impossible promises and harnessed through donations—built a fortune for Glenn Beck, a political career for Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, and a burgeoning media empire for the late Andrew Breitbart.
Even if you think these lawmakers and activists are sincere—and I do—it’s hard not to see the whole operation as a perpetual swindle. Take the Affordable Care Act. With the re-election of President Obama, odds of repeal were slim-to-none. But rather than abandon the call for Obamacare repeal, conservative groups—and their allies in Congress—pushed further. Not because they thought it could happen, but because it was lucrative. As Robert Costa described for National Review at the time, “Business has boomed since the push to defund Obamacare caught on. Conservative activists are lighting up social media, donations are pouring in, and e-mail lists are growing.”


Republican Leadership Conference: The GOP’s speakers lineup is a problem.

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Politicians Scramble to Delete Pro-Bergdahl Tweets as Backlash Grows

At least six politicians have now deleted tweets they sent about Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.
All of them sent tweets offering initial praise of Bergdahl's release, only to later backtrack and pull the posts off the web. But thanks to Politwoops, a website from the Sunlight Foundation, the Internet never forgets.


Politicians Scramble to Delete Pro-Bergdahl Tweets as Backlash Grows

Conservative Attacks on Bergdahl Deal Suggest They Oppose Rescuing POW | New Republic

t's difficult to work up sympathy for the conservatives second-guessing the negotiated release of an American POW in Afghanistan, when they and their fellow travelers spent Monday doing things like this and this and this and debating whether Bowe Bergdahl should have been rescued at all on Fox News.
But despite all that, they take tremendous umbrage at the suggestion that their actions provide any insight into their beliefs, and particularly at the suggestion that they think we should've left Bergdahl behind.
Conservative Attacks on Bergdahl Deal Suggest They Oppose Rescuing POW | New Republic

Neil deGrasse Tyson takes on his most ferocious opponent yet: Capitalism - Salon.com

Monday, June 02, 2014

Yes, All Men - NYTimes.com

"He explained that he had never truly been aware of the extent of his own male privilege until recently, and that after watching the #YesAllWomen campaign unfold and doing quite a bit of reading, he had begun to chafe at the subconscious — and sometimes overt — gender inequity that pervades our society and the world."

NYTimes: The Vanishing Cry of ‘Repeal It’

" It was supposed to be so easy this election year for Republican congressional candidates. All they would have to do was shout “repeal Obamacare!” and make a crack about government doctors and broken websites, and they could coast into office on a wave of public fury. The failure of the Affordable Care Act was simply assumed.

But it has not quite worked out that way. The government website was fixed, and 8.1 million people managed to sign up for insurance through the exchanges. An additional 4.8 million people received coverage through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Three million people under the age of 26 were covered by their parents’ plans. Though the law itself has never been widely popular, most people say they like its component parts, and a large majority now says it wants the law improved rather than repealed."